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my current markup is as follows:

<li class="multi_answer"> 
    <label for="checkbox2">
        <div class="multi_answer_box">
            <input type="checkbox" id="checkbox2" name="checkbox2" class="multi_box" />
        </div>
        <div class="multi_answer_text">Checkbox Label</div>
    </label>
</li>

works great in everything BUT firefox.

after inspecting the markup, it's reading it as...

<li class="multi_answer">
    <label for="checkbox1"> </label>
    <div class="multi_answer_box">
        <input id="checkbox1" class="multi_box" type="checkbox" name="checkbox1">
    </div>
    <div class="multi_answer_text"> Increased counseling staff </div>
</li>

ideas why FF would be interpreting it this way?

I also am using this css

.multi_answer label:hover {
    background:#DDD;
}

.multi_answer_box input {
    padding-left:5px;
    padding-right:5px;
    float:left;
    height:48px;
    width:48px;
}

.multi_answer label {
    overflow: auto;
    cursor:pointer;
    width:auto;
    margin:10px;
    padding: 10px;
    -moz-border-radius: 7px;
    border-radius: 7px;
    background:#CCC;
    display:block;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/NhD3r/1/ <---- working example

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Probably because label must contain inline elements only, and not block elements like div.

SOLUTION

replacing all div's with span's retained intended styling and function while complying with above stated rule.

<li class="multi_answer"> 
    <label for="checkbox2">
        <span class="multi_answer_box">
            <input type="checkbox" id="checkbox2" name="checkbox2" class="multi_box" />
        </span>
        <span class="multi_answer_text">Checkbox Label</span>
    </label>
</li>
share|improve this answer
    
Good thought, but I have changed this in CSS, sorry, I'll add that to the question. –  jondavidjohn Aug 31 '11 at 16:57
2  
You cannot make a block element an inline element by CSS. The HTML parser "corrects" your input before even considering CSS. –  Kay Aug 31 '11 at 17:00
    
I'm not, I'm making an inline element a block element... –  jondavidjohn Aug 31 '11 at 17:02
2  
CSS has nothing to do with this, <label> cannot contain block level elements (by specs). –  Second Rikudo Aug 31 '11 at 17:02
1  
@jondavidjohn - HTML5 standardized it. Before, you were at the mercy of whatever error recovery the browsers happened to have in place. It's still an error in HTML5, it's just that what happens to recover from it is the same across all HTML5 compliant browsers. –  Alohci Aug 31 '11 at 17:13

I can't replicate your problem, I'm using FF6, anyway, you should try to validate your HTML and see if there's anything that may cause FF to behave the way it does. Also try clearing you cache (you can never know...)

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You can reorganize the HTML structure to be valid and follow the spec and still get the effect you want.

<li class="multi_answer">
    <div class="multi_answer_box">
        <input type="checkbox" id="checkbox3" name="checkbox3" class="multi_box" />
        <label for="checkbox3">Did some additional important stuff and things,
               with a description that's long enough to wrap</label>
    </div>
</li>

See the updated fiddle.

I made these changes and tested using Firefox 3.6.12 on Linux.

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