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In my last question, I asked how to join on a program such that I would always get the most recent program for a particular client. ypercube gave an answer that seems to work well, but now I'm concerned that when I add more where conditions to the overall query, it won't work as expected.

For example, if I add an extra condition at the bottom of my query:

SELECT  c.*, p.*
FROM    clients AS c
JOIN    programs AS p
ON      p.id = 
        (
        SELECT  pi.id
        FROM    programs AS pi
        WHERE   pi.client_id = c.id
        ORDER BY
                pi.close_date=0 DESC, pi.close_date DESC
        LIMIT 1
        )
WHERE p.somefield='somevalue'

Let's say a client has 2 active programs, 1 for which p.somefield='somevalue' is true, the other for which it is false, However, the false one is the one that was chosen for the join (it has a more recent close date)... will this client not be selected at all then, or will it just choose the other (less recently closed) program for him?

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You would simply add the p.somefield check into the subquery to avoid this.

SELECT  c.*, p.*
FROM    clients AS c
JOIN    programs AS p
ON      p.id = 
        (
        SELECT  pi.id
        FROM    programs AS pi
        WHERE   pi.client_id = c.id
          AND   pi.somefield='somevalue'
        ORDER BY
                pi.close_date=0 DESC, pi.close_date DESC
        LIMIT 1
        )

Since you want to lay a restriction on the records found from programs, it only makes sense to implement that restriction as soon as possible. Not only to avoid the problem you sketch in your question, but also for performance reasons.

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Yes, but I want to know if it actually is a problem (will fetch incorrect results, not just performance reasons). There are a lot of other conditions, and because of the way my framework is laid out, it's a lot easier to keep all the logic in one place, rather than having to make an exception for "things that relate to the program". I've got about 25 different client lists, and the joins are always the same, but the where conditions differ. –  Mark Aug 31 '11 at 17:38
1  
@Mark You must do it this way. When you put this selection outside the sub-select then it is in fact a different query with potentially different results. The where clause in your query is applied after the db may have choosen the "wrong" p.id. –  Fabian Barney Aug 31 '11 at 17:42
    
@Fatal: Ok. I just wanted to confirm that was the case, and that it didn't choose a different one to join on based on the outer where. –  Mark Sep 1 '11 at 2:02
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