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Here is the problem, I wanted to define a property which accepts decimal numbers and do some process on the value and return string such as the below:

Public Property Amount() As String
    Get
        Return Utility.PaddingRight(Me.msAmount.ToString(), 10)
    End Get
    Set(ByVal vsValue As Decimal)
        Me.msAmount = vsValue
    End Set
End Property

But compilers warns "Set parameters must have the same type of the containing property."

It doesn't look like it should throws an error since it looks legit.

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Except it isn't 'legit' because it is wrong and completely against the language specification. –  msarchet Aug 31 '11 at 18:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The reason that you can't is because what you put into a property should be exactly the same as what you get out of it. If the type changed then this condition would never be true. Microsoft's spec says that "Properties are like smart fields". Imagine if a field (class variable) changed between reading and writing.

Your goal is completely valid but that's not the intended use for properties. (By "intended goal" I mean Microsoft's intended goal.) Your design would also opens doors for potential problems if an invalid or null string were passed in. One of the design goals for properties is that they are light weight and shouldn't throw errors. They can but shouldn't. The recommended solution is to use the TryParse pattern for your property.

EDIT

Sorry, my brain was sidetracked, your goal is changing the getter, not the setter. The pattern that you're looking for is just a read-only property (as @msarchet pointed out) that's specific to your getter. For instance, AmountForPrint or something. You should still include a read/write for your actual value, too.

Public ReadOnly Property AmountForPrint
    Get
        Return Me.Amount.ToString()
    End Get
End Property
Public Property Amount As Integer
    Get

    End Get
    Set(value As Integer)

    End Set
End Property
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I think you need a to do this with a method not a property

Public Function Amount(ByVal value As Decimal) As String

End Function
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Yeah but I am wondering why I am not allowed to this with Properties. Why didn't Microsoft let us do that? –  Tarik Aug 31 '11 at 17:51
    
A property is similiar to a declaring a public member variable. It just gives you a wrapper around the variable access to allow you to put additional code. But from outside the object, to callers, it looks like a variable and a variable cannot be both a string and a decimal. –  JNappi Aug 31 '11 at 17:53

This is just a shot in the dark . . .

Set(ByVal vsValue As String)
    Me.msAmount = System.Convert.ToDecimal(vsValue)
End Set
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It is not something I really want. I want to accept only decimal numbers and encapsulate what's happening to this value inside of my class. –  Tarik Aug 31 '11 at 17:40
    
This is probably serious overkill, but you could look into Type Converters –  clarkb86 Aug 31 '11 at 18:05

You'd be far better off doing this as such

Public Read Only Property Amount() As String
    Get
         Return Utility.PaddingRight(Me.msAmount.ToString(), 10)
    End Get
End Property

Public Sub SetAmount(ByVal value As Decimal)
    Me.msAmount = value
End Sub
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