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I was googling and found the following syntax for pointers

  void main()
 {
  char a[10]="helloworld";
  char *p=a;
  printf("%c",p[0]);
 }

I didnt know that Pointers can be accessed in the array form too. I used to use * for pointer operations I used a[0] for arrays and *p for pointer operations, which is why I didnt know the other 2 things. Now from the above, we can access the second element of array in any one of the following ways

  printf("%C",a[1]);   \\ this is the array
  printf("%c",*(a+1));  \\ this is the array using *
  printf("%c", p[1]);     \\ using the pointer 
  printf("%C",*(p+1));    \\ using the pointer

Now I wonder: which is the faster operation? I read that operations using pointers are faster, and that this is why C stays at the top for fast execution and that no other language can beat its fastness.

Now the real question: What makes the pointer operations faster?

1) *(p+0) the *(Value at address) that makes the trick or

2) p[0]

since we use

 *(a+1) or *(p+1) both are same 
  a[1] or p[1] both are same 

when a normal array can be used as *(a+1)( which uses * value at address) like a pointer. why do we use pointers for faster operations? When both have the same syntax, when normal array and pointer uses * in those syntaxes why pointers are faster?

But guys please tell me then why we use pointers ? My professor told me pointers are faster because they point to address rather a variable should be searched in the location.

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6  
Pointers are not faster than arrays, so the question is meaningless. Within the context of your example array is generally faster than pointer, although the difference is disappearingly small. –  AndreyT Aug 31 '11 at 17:38
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/4939834/… –  hari Aug 31 '11 at 17:38
3  
I think you confuse dereferencing a pointer like *p with addressing an array with a[i]. The latter is slower because it invokes a calculation(namely adding to the base address a the size of the type pointed to times i or a + sizeof(*a) * i. –  Nobody Aug 31 '11 at 17:39
    
I would imaging that in normal circumstances, with modern compilers the speed difference will be negligible. There might be situations where pointers will be more effective, but they should be less and less frequent. –  Max Aug 31 '11 at 17:46
    
Read section 6 of the comp.lang.c FAQ. –  Keith Thompson Aug 31 '11 at 17:49

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I wouldn't actually expect *(ptr + offset) to be faster than ptr[offset]. In fact, on my machine, the following functions are compiled into exactly the same assembly code:

int
ArrayRef(int* array, int index)
{
    return array[index];
}

int
PointerRef(int* array, int index)
{
    return *(array + index);
}

which (cleaned up) looks like:

ArrayRef:
    pushq   %rbp
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
    movq    %rdi, -8(%rbp)
    movl    %esi, -12(%rbp)
    movl    -12(%rbp), %eax
    cltq
    salq    $2, %rax
    addq    -8(%rbp), %rax
    movl    (%rax), %eax
    leave
    ret

PointerRef:
    pushq   %rbp
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
    movq    %rdi, -8(%rbp)
    movl    %esi, -12(%rbp)
    movl    -12(%rbp), %eax
    cltq
    salq    $2, %rax
    addq    -8(%rbp), %rax
    movl    (%rax), %eax
    leave
    ret

(gcc 4.5.0, x86_64, no optimisations). Or with -O3

ArrayRef:
    movslq  %esi, %rsi
    movl    (%rdi,%rsi,4), %eax
    ret

PointerRef:
    movslq  %esi, %rsi
    movl    (%rdi,%rsi,4), %eax
    ret
share|improve this answer

Array access is faster if the array is allocated in the local stack scope or in static memory since it can be directly accessed via an offset of the value in the EBP register or via a direct offset from a fixed address, rather than attempting to access the value of a pointer in a stack variable, and then adding to that variable's value and dereferencing.

For instance, if you write you array like:

int main()
{
    int array[5] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
    //... more code

    return 0;
}

In order to access the value at array[3], the complier will only issue a simple command like (this is for x86):

MOV -8(%ebp), %eax

This is because if we look at the stack, we would see the following:

EBP + 4 : Return Address
EBP     : Previous function's stack activation record
EBP - 4 : array[4]
EBP - 8 : array[3]
EBP - 12: array[2]
EBP - 16: array[1]
EBP - 20: array[0]

So in order to access the value at array[3], only one instruction is needed. That's very fast.

share|improve this answer
    
this is not theory, this is simply true. Problem is that optimizer often generates the better code anyway –  unkulunkulu Aug 31 '11 at 17:40
    
when arrays are faster whats the need for pointers? My professor told me that pointers are faster since they directly point to the address but where a variable should be searched in the location for the address –  niko Aug 31 '11 at 17:43
    
That is not true at all. In machine code, it is generally not faster to access [stack frame pointer register + offset] than to access [fixed address + offset] (e.g. global array) or [pointer + offset] (heap), if the pointer is kept in a register. If the array is accessed via a pointer, it doesn't matter where it is. –  Rudy Velthuis Aug 31 '11 at 17:45
    
You have to get the pointer in the register first ... –  Jason Aug 31 '11 at 17:46
    
Yes, you'll have to get it in the register first. That is something an optimizer takes care of, i.e. you usually only do that once. And [fixed address + offset] doesn't even need the EBP (or whatever) register. If you profile such code, you'll find there is no noticeable difference and nothing that should be prematurely optimized. –  Rudy Velthuis Aug 31 '11 at 17:50

In the examples that you provided, p[1] will not be faster than a[1].

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Array is a pointer, there is no difference between p and a after

char a[10]="helloworld";
char *p=a;

both a and p are a pointer to char and they are pointing to the same place - beginning of your array in memory.

using "operator []" is equivalent to pointer arithmetic too

a[i] 

will be substituted to

*(a+i)

it means that pointer to the beginning of the array will be shifted by i*sizeof(char) to the place of i-th element of your array.

The real difference in time appears when you try loop over all elements, for example, copy the string:

char a[10] = "helloworld";
char b[10];
for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i) b[i] = a[i]; // using array element accessing method

will produce arithmetic like b+i (aka b shift by i*sizeof(char) ) and a+i (aka a shift by i*sizeof(char) ) for each iteration of loop, and

char a[10] = "helloworld";
char b[10];
char *_a, *_b;
for (_a = a, _b = b; *_a != '\0'; ++_a, ++_b) *_a = *_b; // using pointers arithmetic method
*b = '\0';

is free from this those calculations, you only shift two pointers by size of char each time.

share|improve this answer
    
Arrays are most definitely not pointers. Arrays decay or are implicitly converted into pointers when used on the right-hand side of the assignment operator and when passed as a function argument. –  Jason Aug 31 '11 at 17:53
    
ops, you're right, array differs from pointer syntactically and you'll get different sizeof() result, but actually they act in the same way when accessing to element, and you may write char a[10] = "12345"; char* b; b = a; printf ("%c\n", b[2]); –  Nick Sep 1 '11 at 14:42

An array name is essentially the pointer to the first element of that array - so, they should be pretty much the same.

Statically created arrays have their own type which incorporates their compile-time defined size which makes them different than pointers technically, but for all intensive purposes the array name and the character pointer in your example can be used identically.

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But i read pointer concepts makes c much faster is that wrong? –  niko Aug 31 '11 at 17:41
2  
Arrays are convertible to pointers, but they are not pointers, and they are not always interchangeable with each other (e.g. &a and &p will emit completely different results). –  hamstergene Aug 31 '11 at 17:44
    
C's ability to directly access memory addresses via pointers, and its inherent design as a low-level language make it faster than other languages which add more complexity to protect you from these things (C#, Java). But with regard to C itself, pointers and arrays shouldn't be treated differently unless you're dealing with some type issues when passing them as arguments. "Nobody" commented on your question and explain how using a subscript operator ([]) can be less efficient than using the de-reference operator (*) and that can be relevant to your confusion - its a good comment. –  w00te Aug 31 '11 at 17:44
    
And make sure you read Eugene's comment above my last one - that makes a good point that I wasn't clear enough on - my bad :) –  w00te Aug 31 '11 at 17:45
    
That may have been true in the days when different addressing modes did matter. These days, there is hardly any difference. It is not something to consider as premature optimization method. –  Rudy Velthuis Aug 31 '11 at 17:52

Pointers being faster than arrays is coming from the following example.

Say you want to implement the strcpy function, i.e. copy one null-terminated string to another. Let's look at two examples:

First one:

char* strcpy(char* dest, const char* src)
{
    int i = 0;
    while( src[i] != '\0' ) {
        dest[i] = src[i];
        i++;
    }
    dest[i] = '\0';

    return dest;
}

Second one:

char* strcpy(char* dest, const char* src)
{
    char *save = dest;
    while( *src != '\0' )
    {
        *dest++ = *src++;
    }
    *dest = '\0';

     return save;
}

The second example is implemented more efficiently, cause it does less memory modifications in each iteration, and it uses pointers instead of arrays. But there are two things:

  1. It's not pointers which are fast, it's algorithm using them for optimization.
  2. Optimizer can easily perform this kind of optimization automatically, so you probably end up with the same generated code anyway.
share|improve this answer
1  
-1: That might have been true in the days of the PDP-11, but not now –  Paul R Aug 31 '11 at 17:56
    
@Paul, yes, this is mentioned in the answer, this is oversimplified example and this is explained –  unkulunkulu Aug 31 '11 at 18:10

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