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#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
struct test{
    char b;
    int a;
    int c ; 
    };
int main()
{
    struct test inst;
    struct test *ptr_test = &inst;
    char * ptr_ch;
    int* ptr_i;

    /*ptr_ch = (char *) ptr_test;*/
    ptr_ch = (char*)ptr_test;
    ptr_i = (int *) ptr_test;
    *ptr_ch = 'b';
    *ptr_i = 13; 

    printf("char b = %c, int a = %d int c = %d", inst.b, inst.a, inst.c);

    return 0;
}

I expected the output to give the appropriate values of a,b and garbage value of c. But on the terminal, if I do ./a.out the output is:

, int a = 134513785 int c = 13173540

When I do $./a.out > tmp; vim tmp, the output is:

char b = ^M, int a = 134513785 int c = 12714788

What is the problem?

I wanted to access individual fields of the struct using typecasting.

for instance, I wanted to know another way to return the value of &(inst.a).

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5 Answers 5

Your pointers

ptr_ch = (char*)ptr_test;
ptr_i = (int *) ptr_test;

do not automatically refer to the first apropriate member variable (in your case b and a). Rather they just reinterpret the pointer to the structure as pointer to char or int, so they point to the same location, the address of your structure. With the char you might be lucky that it's the first member and you are really pointing to the char, but your int pointer points to the same address and therefore overwrites it with platform- and compiler-dependent garbage.

So don't do those kinds of things (or do them when you really know what you are doing and, more important, where (on what platform and with what compiler) you are doing it).

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ptr_ch and ptr_i point to the same memory location:

ptr_ch = (char*)ptr_test;
ptr_i = (int *) ptr_test;

when you do the following you are reading from the same memory address:

*ptr_ch = 'b'; //write the first sizeof(char) byte of the structure ptr_test
*ptr_i = 13;   //write the first sizeof(int) bytes of the structure ptr_test overwriting some bytes wrote before

You should eventually do something like:

ptr_ch = &(ptr_test->b);
*ptr_ch = 'b';
ptr_i = &(ptr_test->a);
*ptr_i = 13; 
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Why would you use the typecasting? Why not do the following:

ptr_ch = &(ptr_test->b);
ptr_i = &(ptr_test->a);
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If you're not explaining what the problem is and therefore answering his question in any way, then it would better fit as a comment. –  Christian Rau Aug 31 '11 at 18:15

13 is decimal for an ASCII carriage return - when you do *ptr_i = 13;, you're setting b to that 13. If you change your print out to look like:

printf("char b = %c (%d), int a = %d int c = %d", inst.b, inst.b, inst.a, inst.c);

You'll see that you get:

(13), int a = 1 int c = 1606416024

as output instead. The carriage return character is causing your char b output to get overwritten by the output following the carriage return character. It might be more obvious if you used a different number than 13. For example, using 86, you'll get:

char b = V, int a = 1 int c = 1606416024

as the output. The reason a and c don't make sense is because they're uninitialized.

You can't just typecast a structure pointer to a pointer of another type and expect the compiler to extract a pointer to a field inside that structure for you - that's not how it works. I think you might have been trying to do this:

ptr_ch = &ptr_test->b;
ptr_i = &ptr_test->a;

Here's a complete example program that does what I think you're trying for:

#include<stdio.h>

struct test {
  char b;
  int a;
  int c; 
};

int main(void)
{
  struct test inst = {0, 0, 0};
  struct test *ptr_test = &inst;
  char *ptr_ch;
  int *ptr_i;

  ptr_ch = &ptr_test->b;
  ptr_i = &ptr_test->a;
  *ptr_ch = 'b';
  *ptr_i = 86; 

  printf("char b = %c, int a = %d int c = %d\n", inst.b, inst.a, inst.c);

  return 0;
}

And its output:

char b = b, int a = 86 int c = 0
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thank you so much.. that was really helpful..!!! –  nabbercoder Aug 31 '11 at 19:08

You should use the strict conforming offsetof macro, which calculates the offset of any struct element from struct begin:

 ptr_ch = (char*)ptr_test;
*ptr_ch = 'b';

 ptr_i = ptr_ch + offsetof(struct test,a);
*ptr_i = 13; 
 ptr_i = ptr_ch + offsetof(struct test,c);
*ptr_i = 14; 
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The lines that assign to ptr_i need casts. C does not permit implicit conversion from char * to int *. –  R.. Aug 31 '11 at 18:37

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