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I'm fine with most of the program up until the signature of selectionsort where there is a pointer to a function called compare but I don't see the function anywhere in this code. I guess what I'm trying to ask is how is compare working?

// Fig. 8.20: fig08_20.cpp
// Multipurpose sorting program using function pointers.
#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
using namespace std;

// prototypes
void selectionSort( int [], const int, bool (*)( int, int ) );
void swap( int * const, int * const );   
bool ascending( int, int ); // implements ascending order
bool descending( int, int ); // implements descending order

int main()
{
   const int arraySize = 10;
   int order; // 1 = ascending, 2 = descending
   int counter; // array index
   int a[ arraySize ] = { 2, 6, 4, 8, 10, 12, 89, 68, 45, 37 };

   cout << "Enter 1 to sort in ascending order,\n" 
      << "Enter 2 to sort in descending order: ";
   cin >> order;
   cout << "\nData items in original order\n";

   // output original array
   for ( counter = 0; counter < arraySize; counter++ )
      cout << setw( 4 ) << a[ counter ];

   // sort array in ascending order; pass function ascending 
   // as an argument to specify ascending sorting order
   if ( order == 1 ) 
   {
      selectionSort( a, arraySize, ascending );
      cout << "\nData items in ascending order\n";
   } // end if

   // sort array in descending order; pass function descending
   // as an argument to specify descending sorting order
   else 
   {
      selectionSort( a, arraySize, descending );
      cout << "\nData items in descending order\n";
   } // end else part of if...else

   // output sorted array
   for ( counter = 0; counter < arraySize; counter++ )
      cout << setw( 4 ) << a[ counter ];

   cout << endl;
} // end main

// multipurpose selection sort; the parameter compare is a pointer to
// the comparison function that determines the sorting order
void selectionSort( int work[], const int size,
                    bool (*compare)( int, int ) )
{
   int smallestOrLargest; // index of smallest (or largest) element

   // loop over size - 1 elements
   for ( int i = 0; i < size - 1; i++ )
   {
      smallestOrLargest = i; // first index of remaining vector

      // loop to find index of smallest (or largest) element
      for ( int index = i + 1; index < size; index++ )
         if ( !(*compare)( work[ smallestOrLargest ], work[ index ] ) )
            smallestOrLargest = index;

      swap( &work[ smallestOrLargest ], &work[ i ] );
   } // end if
} // end function selectionSort

// swap values at memory locations to which 
// element1Ptr and element2Ptr point
void swap( int * const element1Ptr, int * const element2Ptr )
{
   int hold = *element1Ptr;
   *element1Ptr = *element2Ptr;
   *element2Ptr = hold;
} // end function swap

// determine whether element a is less than 
// element b for an ascending order sort
bool ascending( int a, int b )
{
   return a < b; // returns true if a is less than b
} // end function ascending

// determine whether element a is greater than 
// element b for a descending order sort
bool descending( int a, int b )
{
   return a > b; // returns true if a is greater than b
} // end f   return a > b; // returns true if a is greater than b
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I'm not sure I understand.. The code compiles so why would I need to fix anything? –  Lightyear Buzz Aug 31 '11 at 18:15
3  
As as said before, downvote without a comment should not be allowed. This is a perfectly ok question. –  MK. Aug 31 '11 at 18:16
    
Comment in then retracted with downvote. The title is still awful though. –  user166390 Aug 31 '11 at 18:17
3  
@pst Title is not perfect, but sometimes in order to come up with a good title you need to know the answer. What would you put for a title in this case (assume you, well, don't understand what is going on in the code)? –  MK. Aug 31 '11 at 18:21

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

where there is a pointer to a function called compare

Invoid selectionSort( int work[], const int size,bool (*compare)( int, int ) ) compare is just the local name of the (last) argument. Just like work is the local name for the array(pointer actually...) you pass in as the first argument, compare is the local name of a function pointer you pass it.

In this code, you pass it function pointers to the ascending and descending functions.

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Compare is the name of the argument (variable name). It points to a function which is passed to the sort function. You can pass either ascending or descending "comparator" function as this argument value and it will determine the direction of the sort.

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Precisely...

That's called a function pointer. Guess you should read some documentation about it, as it seems you don't know about this.

The selectionSort function takes a pointer to another function as parameter, to apply the comparison.

It means YOU have to declare this function, and pass a pointer to it when using selectionSort.

The name compare is just the argument's name. The function itself can have any name.

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Your ascending and descending functions (or rather, pointers thereto) are passed as the compare argument to the selectionSort function.

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The parameter "compare" is a pointer to a function, that can be either descending or ascending.

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The line:

(*compare)( work[ smallestOrLargest ], work[ index ] )

Calls the compare parameter which is the address of a function passed in to the sort method here defined as:

void selectionSort( int work[], const int size, bool (*compare)( int, int ) );

So, it's actually calling the ascending or descending function when the first code line in my post is called, since ascending and descending are the function names/addresses passed into selectionSort.

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The compare () function is simply a function which accepts two parameters (ints) and returns a bool , true or false.

The order of the sorting is controlled by passing the correct function when calling the selection search function. The address of this comparison function which can be anything with the certain signature is received by the selection sort function, and stored locally with the name compare which is later used to determine if to do the swap or not, inorder to make the sorting.

Now if you wanted to sort in ascending order you needed one condition, and for decending order you needed another condition (depending on your code). You have two functions accepting the two operands of the conditional operators, which return true or false depending on the conditional operators (your ascending and descending functions). Getting one of these functions as pointers and calling them makes the sort generic. Depending on which function you have passed the outcome of the call compare in the sort function will be different resulting in different sorting order.

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Yes the syntax of function/method pointers is very hard to read.

Suggestion for reading

Thus I like to typedef them to make reading their usage easier.

// OK this part is still hard to read
typedef bool (CompareFuncPtr*)( int, int );   

// But this is now eas(ier) to read.
void selectionSort( int [], const int, CompareFuncPtr compare);

Usage (Passing a function as a parameter)

Back to your original question:
So you have selectionSort() that takes a third parameter that is a compare:

  selectionSort( a, arraySize, ascending );

So now you can see that the function it is using is ascending.
Scanning your code we find this here:

// determine whether element a is less than 
// element b for an ascending order sort
bool ascending( int a, int b )
{
   return a < b; // returns true if a is less than b
} // end function ascending

Notice that the prototype of this function matches the function pointer definition (takes two integers as parameters and returns a bool). If the function type does not match the function pointer type then you have a compiler error.

Calling (Calling a function via a function pointer).

If you are asking how it is called:
Looking at the function:

void selectionSort( int work[], const int size, bool (*compare)( int, int ) )

The third parameter is compare.
Note how my version is easier to read.

So if we look for comparing being used:

     if ( !(*compare)( work[ smallestOrLargest ], work[ index ] ) )

Basically the syntax for calling a function through a pointer is:

ResultType result = (*funcPtr)(<ParameterList>);

In your code we are using the return value immediately rather than storing it in a variable but the concept is the same and the two parameters passed are: work[ smallestOrLargest ] and work[ index ] which we assume are some integer values.

Note. The compiler checks the input and outputs of a function pointer call in the same way that it checks calls to a normal function. The parameters passed must match the expected parameters (in the same way as a normal function (thus you can get auto conversion)) and the result is treated as the appropriate type.

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