Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to create a background that looks something like an excel spreadsheet. White table cells, thin borders around each cell. I know how to do this easily with a single image, and I know how to do this with tables...but I would like to do this without either, if possible.

The size of each cell will be fixed at 20x20, so I don't have to worry about resizing. Any thoughts? I sort of had a way cooked up that involved a ton of inner markup, but I figured that was almost as bad as using a table.

The purpose of this background will be allowing users to arrange blocks on a grid. Using jQuery UI's drag and drop functionality, I want the user to be able to move blocks around within a confined grid. The gridlines would simply show them where in the grid their blocks are bound to. An example of this grid snapping (without the gridlines) is available at http://jqueryui.com/demos/draggable/#snap-to

share|improve this question
4  
If this is strictly for a background you should use an image.. if the cells will be holding tabular data.. you should use a table. –  Loktar Aug 31 '11 at 18:16
4  
What's the point of the background? Are you going to put data inside these cells? It's considered correct to use tables for tabular data. –  Brandon Cordell Aug 31 '11 at 18:18
1  
You can do it with a css gradient and multiple backgrounds, but browser support isn't amazing, an image is really your best bet here. –  Second Rikudo Aug 31 '11 at 18:20

2 Answers 2

I have searched also for this problem and i found a very good solution:

background-size: 40px 40px;    
background-image:repeating-linear-gradient(0deg, #fff, #fff 1px, transparent 1px, transparent 40px),repeating-linear-gradient(-90deg, #fff, #fff 1px, transparent 1px, transparent 40px);

To change the grid size, change the background-size and the last px option within the gradient. To change the grid width change the first px option within the gradient. First gradient is horizontal, second is for the vertical lines.

for this demo I recognized that the css option:

position: absolute

was required. I will build up my grid now and if I get more information I will add them within a comment.

Hope this helps :)

share|improve this answer
    
I searched for this so long. Thank you. –  Diskilla Mar 12 '14 at 12:14
    
salute man! awesomeness! –  Eirenaios Sep 22 '14 at 12:50

Use a background image; don't waste your time fiddling with markup. You're not going to get any more efficient than this:

background:url(data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhFAAUAIAAAMDAwP///yH5BAEAAAEALAAAAAAUABQAAAImhI+pwe3vAJxQ0hssnnq/7jVgmJGfGaGiyoyh68GbjNGXTeEcGxQAOw==);

Example.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice one, at least for debugging. Thanks! –  FelipeAls Jul 19 '12 at 14:22
    
That looks awesome but how to define the square size (with a parameter) or even choose another colour? Thanks! –  Rui Marques Jan 10 '13 at 13:04
2  
@RuiMarques: Make another image. There are tools that generate data URIs for you. –  josh3736 Jan 10 '13 at 14:44
    
@josh3736 yes but I would like create the image dynamically so I will need the javascript code to do it. I already found a way but it requires HTML5 canvas, I wanted to somehow avoid needing it. –  Rui Marques Jan 10 '13 at 15:26
    
Something like this, but this is more complex (powerfull) than what i need ahahah: xarg.org/2010/03/… –  Rui Marques Jan 10 '13 at 16:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.