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Rather than describing what I want (it's difficult to explain), Let me provide an example of what I need to accomplish in C# using a regular expression:

"HelloWorld" should be transformed to "Hello World" 
"HelloWORld" should be transformed to "Hello WO Rld" //Two consecutive letters in capital should be treatead as one word
"helloworld" should be transformed to "helloworld"

EDIT:

"HellOWORLd" should be transformed to "Hell OW OR Ld"

Every 2-consecutive capital letters should be considered one word.

Is this possible?

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5  
What about five consecutive uppercase letters? How is that expected to transform? To three words? –  Oded Aug 31 '11 at 18:21
4  
Since "regular expressions" match things, but don't transform things, perhaps you could clarify your question. –  Randal Schwartz Aug 31 '11 at 18:24
1  
If you want a parser, write a parser. –  Carl Norum Aug 31 '11 at 18:24
2  
Why does it need to be a regex? Using normal code this is trivial. –  CodesInChaos Aug 31 '11 at 18:24
    
@CodeInChaos I know is trivial but I wonder if it's possible to accomplish using a regex. This one "(?!^)([A-Z])" will almost do what I want but I don't know how to detect 2 consecutive capital letters. –  Icarus Aug 31 '11 at 18:30

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This is fully working C# code, not just the regex:

Console.WriteLine(
    Regex.Replace(
        "HelloWORld", 
        "(?<!^)(?<wordstart>[A-Z]{1,2})", 
        " ${wordstart}", RegexOptions.Compiled));

And it prints:

Hello WO Rld

Update

To make this more UNICODE/international aware, consider replacing [A-Z] by \p{Lt} (meaning a UNICODE code point that represents a Letter in uppercase). The result for the current input would the same. So here is a slightly more compelling example:

Console.WriteLine(Regex.Replace(
            @"ÉclaireürfØÑJßå",
            @"(?<!^)(?<wordstart>\p{Lu}{1,2})", 
            @" ${wordstart}",
            RegexOptions.Compiled));
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1  
Thank you! This is the best so far! –  Icarus Aug 31 '11 at 18:52
    
added a note about localization and Unicode (ideone.com clearly needs to learn a thing or two there: ideone.com/0k1wE) –  sehe Aug 31 '11 at 19:07
    
Thanks again. Updated my code. :) –  Icarus Aug 31 '11 at 19:09

The regular expression engine is not a transformative thing by nature, but rather a pattern matching (and replacing) engine. People often mistake the replace part of Regex, thinking that it can do more than it's designed to.

Back to your question, though... Regex cannot do what you want, instead, you should write your own parser to do this. With C#, if you're familiar with the language, this task is somewhat trivial.

It's a case of "You're using the wrong tool for the job".

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This "(?!^)([A-Z])" will almost do it but won't account for 2-consecutive capital letters. I had the sense that it was possible to detect them and insert the spaces in between. –  Icarus Aug 31 '11 at 18:34
    
Your edit to the question made this possible with 2 regex calls... the original wording made it sound impossible, and it also seemed like you wanted this done as a single expression, not two. Still, I'm glad you found your answer. –  SpikeX Aug 31 '11 at 18:53

Here are regular expressions that detect what you are looking for:

([A-Z]\w*?)[A-Z]

this matches any uppercase letter from A to Z once followed by aphanumerics up to the next uppercase.

([A-Z]{2}\w*?)[A-Z]

this matches any uppercase letter from A to Z exactly 2 times.

Regex is a matching engine, you can parse the input string and use regex.isMatch to find candidate matches to then insert spaces into the output string

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string f(string input)
{ 
  //'lowerUPPER' -> 'lower UPPER'
  var x = Regex.Replace(input, "([a-z])([A-Z])","$1 $2"); 

  //'UPPER' -> 'UP PE R'
  return Regex.Replace(x, "([A-Z]{2})","$1 "); 
}
share|improve this answer
    
It worked, thanks. Had the impression that it would be possible to write one single expression instead of two. –  Icarus Aug 31 '11 at 18:43
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Print(Parse("HelloWorld"));
        Print(Parse("HelloWORld"));
        Print(Parse("helloworld"));
        Print(Parse("HellOWORLd"));
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    static void Print(IEnumerable<string> input)
    {
        foreach (var s in input)
        {
            Console.Write(s);
            Console.Write(' ');
        }
        Console.WriteLine();
    }

    static IEnumerable<string> Parse(string input)
    {
        var sb = new StringBuilder();
        for (int i = 0; i < input.Length; i++)
        {
            if (!char.IsUpper(input[i]))
            {
                sb.Append(input[i]);
                continue;
            }
            if (sb.Length > 0)
            {
                yield return sb.ToString();
                sb.Clear();
            }
            sb.Append(input[i]);
            if (char.IsUpper(input[i + 1]))
            {
                sb.Append(input[++i]);
                yield return sb.ToString();
                sb.Clear();
            }
        }
        if (sb.Length > 0)
        {
            yield return sb.ToString();
        }
    }
}
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I think does not need regular expression in this case. Try this:

  static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var input = "HellOWORLd";
            var i = 0;
            var x = 4;
            var len = input.Length;
            var output = new List<string>();
            while (x <= len)
            {
                output.Add(SubStr(input, i, x));
                i = x;
                x += 2;

            }
            var ret = output.ToArray(); //["Hell","OW", "OR", "Ld"]

            Console.ReadLine();


        }

static string SubStr(string str, int start, int end)
            {
                var len = str.Length;
                if (start >= 0 && end <= len)
                {
                    var ret = new StringBuilder();
                    for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
                    {
                        if (i == start)
                        {
                            do
                            {
                                ret.Append(str[i]);
                                i++;
                            } while (i != end);
                        }
                    }
                    return ret.ToString();
                }
                return null;
            }
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