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I gotta do the Pythagorean triple in Haskell without symmetrical solutions. My try is:

terna :: Int -> [(Int,Int,Int)]
terna x = [(a,b,c)|a<-[1..x], b<-[1..x], c<-[1..x], (a^2)+(b^2) == (c^2)]

and I get as a result:

Main> terna 10
[(3,4,5),(4,3,5),(6,8,10),(8,6,10)]

As you can see, I´m getting symmetrical solutions like: (3,4,5) (4,3,5). I need to get rid of them but I don´t know how. Can anyone help me?

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4 Answers 4

Don't know Haskell at all (perhaps you're learning it now?) but it seems like you could get rid of them if you could take only the ones for which a is less than or equal to b. That would get rid of the duplicates.

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Or you could avoid generating them to begin with by saying b<-[1..a]. Speaking of which, this is really inefficient for a bunch of other reasons too, if that matters :-) –  sclv Aug 31 '11 at 18:39
    
also, you can speed things up by only considering values of c s.t. c > a+b. –  rampion Aug 31 '11 at 18:40
    
Yes, I´m learning. It takes time :P. Thank you!! –  Sierra Aug 31 '11 at 18:41
1  
@rampion That doesn't make sense. Consider the triangle of a = 3, b = 4, c = 5. Perhaps you ment c < a + b? Or perhaps you wanted c < (a^2 + b^2)^(0.5)? –  Thomas M. DuBuisson Aug 31 '11 at 21:48
    
Thomas: you're right. typo when trying to write the triangle inequality –  rampion Sep 3 '11 at 20:10

Every time you have a duplicate you have one version in which a is greater than b and one where b is greater than a. So if you want to make sure you only ever get one of them, you just need to make sure that either a is always equal to or less than b or vice versa.

One way to achieve this would be to add it as a condition to the list comprehension.

Another, more efficient way, would be to change b's generator to b <- [1..a], so it only generates values for b which are smaller or equal to a.

Speaking of efficiency: There is no need to iterate over c at all. Once you have values for a and b, you could simply calculate (a^2)+(b^2) and check whether it has a natural square root.

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you do not need <=, just < since sqrt(2) is irrational number :D –  Luka Rahne Aug 31 '11 at 18:40
    
wow it works. It was so easy... hehe. Thank you!! –  Sierra Aug 31 '11 at 18:41
    
@ralu: Right, good point. –  sepp2k Aug 31 '11 at 18:45

Try with a simple recursive generator:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formulas_for_generating_Pythagorean_triples

(new article)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tree_of_primitive_Pythagorean_triples

EDIT (7 May 2014)

Here I have made infinite generator that can generate primitive triplets ordered by perimeter (but can be modified to be ordered by other parameter - hypotenuses, area, ...) as long as it holds that any triplet is smaller that any generated from generator matrix according to provided compare function

import Data.List -- for mmult

merge f x [] = x
merge f [] y = y
merge f (x:xs) (y:ys)
               | f x y     =  x : merge f xs     (y:ys) 
               | otherwise =  y : merge f (x:xs) ys 


mmult :: Num a => [[a]] -> [[a]] -> [[a]] 
mmult a b = [ [ sum $ zipWith (*) ar bc | bc <- (transpose b) ] | ar <- a ]

tpgen_matrix = [[[ 1,-2, 2],[ 2 ,-1, 2],[ 2,-2, 3]],
                [[ 1, 2, 2],[ 2 , 1, 2],[ 2, 2, 3]],
                [[-1, 2, 2],[-2 , 1, 2],[-2, 2, 3]]]

matrixsum  =  sum . map sum
tripletsorter x y =  ( matrixsum  x ) < ( matrixsum y ) -- compare perimeter

triplegen_helper b =  foldl1 
            ( merge tripletsorter ) 
            [ h : triplegen_helper h | x <- tpgen_matrix , let h = mmult x b ]

triplets =  x : triplegen_helper x  where x = [[3],[4],[5]]

main =  mapM print $ take 10 triplets
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Nice. Can one of those formulas be written easily in Haskell? ;) –  vikingsteve Feb 5 '14 at 10:57
    
The tree of primitive pythagorean triples is really easy in Haskell. –  Jeremy List May 7 '14 at 5:36

You can do the following:

pythagorean = [ (x,y,m*m+n*n) | 
                                m <- [2..], 
                                n <- [1 .. m-1], 
                                let x = m*m-n*n, 
                                let y = 2*m*n ]
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