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I am initiating an HttpWebRequest and then retrieving it's response. Occasionally, I get a 500 (or at least 5##) error, but no description. I have control over both endpoints and would like the receiving end to get a little bit more information. For example, I would like to pass the exception message from server to client. Is this possible using HttpWebRequest and HttpWebResponse?

Code:

try
{
    HttpWebRequest webRequest = HttpWebRequest.Create(URL) as HttpWebRequest;
    webRequest.Method = WebRequestMethods.Http.Get;
    webRequest.Credentials = new NetworkCredential(Username, Password);
    webRequest.ContentType = "application/x-www-form-urlencoded";
    using(HttpWebResponse response = webRequest.GetResponse() as HttpWebResponse)
    {
        if(response.StatusCode == HttpStatusCode.OK)
        {
            // Do stuff with response.GetResponseStream();
        }
    }
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    ShowError(ex);
    // if the server returns a 500 error than the webRequest.GetResponse() method
    // throws an exception and all I get is "The remote server returned an error: (500)."
}

Any help with this would be much appreciated.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 52 down vote accepted

Is this possible using HttpWebRequest and HttpWebResponse?

You could have your web server simply catch and write the exception text into the body of the response, then set status code to 500. Now the client would throw an exception when it encounters a 500 error but you could read the response stream and fetch the message of the exception.

So you could catch a WebException which is what will be thrown if a non 200 status code is returned from the server and read its body:

catch (WebException ex)
{
    using (var stream = ex.Response.GetResponseStream())
    using (var reader = new StreamReader(stream))
    {
        Console.WriteLine(reader.ReadToEnd());
    }
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    // Something more serious happened
    // like for example you don't have network access
    // we cannot talk about a server exception here as
    // the server probably was never reached
}
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Thanks for your help! –  threed Aug 31 '11 at 19:26
    
Thank you! Important to note that the stream from inside the using statement will not be available outside the using statement, as WebResponse's disposer will clear it. This tripped me up for a few minutes. –  Thorin Feb 24 '12 at 21:05
    
@Thorin nevertheless, there is nothing wrong with the code above. –  jeromeyers Jan 2 '14 at 20:27
    
@Thorin. The "stream" from the first statement is carried on to the next statement. Just like in a single line IF statement, for example if(something)do-stuff-here; –  RealityDysfunction Apr 1 '14 at 21:00
    
Pardon my ignorance, but where exactly would you put this try/catch? I have hundreds of controllers in my project, and I don't want to have to put this everywhere. Is there some kind of catch-all place where I could put this? –  Shaul Behr May 18 at 8:18

I came across this question when trying to check if a file existed on an FTP site or not. If the file doesn't exist there will be an error when trying to check its timestamp. But I want to make sure the error is not something else, by checking its type.

The Response property on WebException will be of type FtpWebResponse on which you can check its StatusCode property to see which FTP error you have.

Here's the code I ended up with:

    public static bool FileExists(string host, string username, string password, string filename)
    {
        // create FTP request
        FtpWebRequest request = (FtpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create("ftp://" + host + "/" + filename);
        request.Credentials = new NetworkCredential(username, password);

        // we want to get date stamp - to see if the file exists
        request.Method = WebRequestMethods.Ftp.GetDateTimestamp;

        try
        {
            FtpWebResponse response = (FtpWebResponse)request.GetResponse();
            var lastModified = response.LastModified;

            // if we get the last modified date then the file exists
            return true;
        }
        catch (WebException ex)
        {
            var ftpResponse = (FtpWebResponse)ex.Response;

            // if the status code is 'file unavailable' then the file doesn't exist
            // may be different depending upon FTP server software
            if (ftpResponse.StatusCode == FtpStatusCode.ActionNotTakenFileUnavailable)
            {
                return false;
            }

            // some other error - like maybe internet is down
            throw;
        }
    }
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