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Unlike normal, I have code that actually works, but I'm wondering if it's the only (or best approach).

The basic Idea is I have an existing application that's handmade data layer is being ported to Entity Framework. As a compromise to minimize code changes, I'm working with existing methods, which tend to take a more disconnected approach. For example I have a lot of things like this:

UpdateNote(int noteId, string note)

I seem to have a method that works for this type of update without requiring a re-fetch:

var context = new MyEntities();
context.Configuration.ValidateOnSaveEnabled = false;
var note = new Model.Note{ Id = noteId, Note = ""};
context.Notes.Attach(note);
note.Note = "Some Note";
context.SaveChanges();

It's a little ugly (though concise enough), so I would like to know if there is there a better approach to use with EF? Any downsides to this method, other than loosing built-in validation?

This is a pattern that will be used all over my app.

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I have a better extension method for this I'll in a little bit. Its a variant of AttachAsModified I grabbed from the net and works great in these scenarios without having to know prop names. –  Adam Tuliper - MSFT Aug 31 '11 at 21:10
    
coming back and looking at this - you will lose your DataAnnotations validation (if thats what you meant) however you will still retain your entity framework validation if you have defined any (for example in code first using the IsRequired() method) –  Adam Tuliper - MSFT Sep 25 '11 at 15:23
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2 Answers

The following extension method for DbContext is an approach which would avoid to initialize your entities with some values different to the values you want to change it to.

public static class EFExtensions
{
    public static void MarkAsModified(this DbContext context, object entity,
        params string[] properties)
    {
        foreach (var property in properties)
            context.Entry(entity).Property(property).IsModified = true;
    }
}

You could then use it this way:

var context = new MyEntities();
context.Configuration.ValidateOnSaveEnabled = false;

var note = new Model.Note { Id = noteId }; // only key properties required to set

note.Note = "Some Note";
note.SomeOtherProperty = 1234;
note.AndAnotherProperty = "XYZ";

context.Notes.Attach(note);
context.MarkAsModified(note, "Note", "SomeOtherProperty" , "AndAnotherProperty");

context.SaveChanges();

Note: This only works for scalar properties, not navigation properties.

Besides validation I could imagine that this approach is problematic for a proper concurrency checking.

Edit

According to @Adam Tuliper's comment below concurrency is likely not a problem because the concurrency check is skipped when an entity is attached manually to the context (without reading it from the database) and marked as modified to send an UPDATE command to the database. It just overwrites the lastest version in the DB. Thanks to Adam for pointing this out!

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I see what you are saying with the initialization, the only thing I don't like about it using string literals for the property names. But what would be problematic with concurrency checking? –  cadmium Aug 31 '11 at 19:44
    
@cadmium: I am actually not sure if it's problematic. But my understanding is that optimistic concurrency checking in EF relies on a concurrency token (which is some property on the entity) stored in the DB. When you save the entity (UPDATE statement) the concurrency token in your object is compared with the value in the DB. If they are different you'll get an optimistic concurrency exception and need to decide what to do. If you don't know the up-to-date concurrency token (which is the case when you don't read it from the DB and just attach a new instance to context) (...continued...) –  Slauma Aug 31 '11 at 19:58
    
(...continued...) your tokens in the entity and DB are always different, so you'll get always a concurrency violation. This is only hypothetic, I don't know enough from practice how concurrency checking works in detail. BTW: I don't like my answer anymore: there are strings for the property names = bad for refactoring. One could introduce a property name extractor to have strongly typing again. But all that reflection... not nice. Perhaps your hand-written way is better, at least faster. –  Slauma Aug 31 '11 at 19:59
1  
@Slauma - I believe EF instead updates the record only where OldValue=KnownOldValye. If no records are updated, you have a concurrency problem and an exception is thrown. If you have a link on what you are talking about though Id def. like to read it, but thats my understanding how it works with field comparisons. Interestingly enough though when I attach an object it does work so maybe if there are no 'known' original values and you attach an object as modified it just goes ahead and updates it without checks. –  Adam Tuliper - MSFT Sep 1 '11 at 18:25
1  
I wanted to add some more info on this, seems concurrency is handled in two separate ways (at least). One I believe is simply to add a timestamp column to your table and decorate its property with the [TimeStamp] attribute. EF will automatically then compare this value in it's where clause. The other case according to the Contoso examle: "you would have to mark all non-primary-key properties in the entity for concurrency tracking by adding the ConcurrencyCheck attribute to them. That change would enable the Entity Framework to include all columns in the SQL WHERE clause of UPDATE statements." –  Adam Tuliper - MSFT Sep 25 '11 at 15:22
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See the following code I use to easily attach a disconnected object back to the graph, assuming we're now going to save it.


public static class EntityFrameworkExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// This class allows you to attach an entity.
    /// For instance, a controller method Edit(Customer customer)
    /// using ctx.AttachAsModified(customer); 
    /// ctx.SaveChanges();
    /// allows you to easily reattach this item for udpating.
    /// Credit goes to: http://geekswithblogs.net/michelotti/archive/2009/11/27/attaching-modified-entities-in-ef-4.aspx
    /// </summary>
    public static void AttachAsModified<T>(this ObjectSet<T> objectSet, T entity) where T : class
    {
        objectSet.Attach(entity);
        objectSet.Context.ObjectStateManager.ChangeObjectState(entity, EntityState.Modified);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// This marks an item for deletion, but does not currently mark child objects (relationships).
    /// For those cases you must query the object, include the relationships, and then delete.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="objectSet"></param>
    /// <param name="entity"></param>
    public static void AttachAsDeleted<T>(this ObjectSet<T> objectSet, T entity) where T : class
    {
        objectSet.Attach(entity);
        objectSet.Context.ObjectStateManager.ChangeObjectState(entity, EntityState.Deleted);
    }

    public static void AttachAllAsModified<T>(this ObjectSet<T> objectSet, IEnumerable<T> entities) where T : class
    {
        foreach (var item in entities)
        {
            objectSet.Attach(item);
            objectSet.Context.ObjectStateManager.ChangeObjectState(item, EntityState.Modified);
        }
    }
}
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Yes, this attaches easily but it is also expensive because by setting the entity state to Modified EF will send a full update command to the DB with all scalar properties, no matter if they really changed or not. This is kind of "brute force" updating. –  Slauma Sep 1 '11 at 9:27
    
yes but unfortunately in most situations we don't know what's changed on the web. We go from a page to some disconnected item. This is even more the case with MVC, where your model is passed in as a disconnected item. You then need to either send that to the db or load an object and then merge the model with this object. In that case you've not only saved every property, but had to do a full load as well. If you AttachAsModified, you can save without a load first. Unless your data page is approaching an 8k limit (or larger with varchar(max) items, Im not sure the perf is going to be an issue. –  Adam Tuliper - MSFT Sep 1 '11 at 13:37
    
I agree. If you don't know what has changed it's a working approach. I had the feeling from the question though that @cadmium is in a situation where he knows which properties did change. But I might be wrong. –  Slauma Sep 1 '11 at 14:20
    
Yes, this particular situation is one where I know what fields have changed and have an incomplete entity (one or two fields) to reconstitute the context. I'm thinking there's not much choice, either I have to take the small hit and re-fetch the entity before the update, or deal with the trickiness of my original post, with perhaps a little MarkAsModified mixed in when necessary. –  cadmium Sep 1 '11 at 17:01
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