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Pretty much as the title says. I have a snippet of code that looks like this:

pid_t = p;

p = fork();

if (p == 0) {
    childfn();
} else if (p > 0) {
    parentfn();
} else {
    // error
}

I want to ensure that either the parent or the child executes (but not returns from) their respective functions before the other.

Something like a call to sleep() would probably work, but is not guaranteed by any standard, and would just be exploiting an implementation detail of the OS's scheduler...is this possible? Would vfork work?

edit: Both of the functions find their way down to a system() call, one of which will not return until the other is started. So to re-iterate: I need to ensure that either the parent or the child only calls their respective functions (but not returns, cause they won't, which is what all of the mutex based solutions below offer) before the other. Any ideas? Sorry for the lack of clarity.

edit2: Having one process call sched_yield and sleep, I seem to be getting pretty reliable results. vfork does provide the semantics I am looking for, but comes with too many restrictions on what I can do in the child process (I can pretty much only call exec). So, I have found some work-arounds that are good enough, but no real solution. vfork is probably the closest thing to what I was looking for, but all the solutions presented below would work more or less.

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I read this as you need a predictable order for the invocation of childfn() and parentfn(), with no particular preference for one or the other - correct? –  Henk Langeveld Nov 12 '11 at 23:22

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This problem would normally be solved by a mutex or a semaphore. For example:

// Get a page of shared memory
int pagesize = getpagesize();
void *mem = mmap(NULL, pagesize, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_SHARED|MAP_ANONYMOUS, -1, 0);
if(!mem)
{
  perror("mmap");
  return 1;
}

// Put the semaphore at the start of the shared page.  The rest of the page
// is unused.
sem_t *sem = mem;
sem_init(sem, 1, 1);

pid_t p = fork();

if (p == 0) {
    sem_wait(sem);
    childfn();
    sem_post(sem);
} else if (p > 0) {
    sem_wait(sem);
    parentfn();
    sem_post(sem);

    int status;
    wait(&status);
    sem_destroy(sem);
} else {
    // error
}

// Clean up
munmap(mem, pagesize);

You could also use a mutex in a shared memory region, but you need to make sure to create with non-default attributes with the process-shared attribute said to shared (via pthread_mutexattr_setpshared(&mutex, PTHREAD_PROCESS_SHARED)) in order for it to work.

This ensures that only one of childfn or parentfn will execute at any given time, but they could run in either order. If you need to have a particular one run first, start the semaphore off with a count of 1 instead of 0, and have the function that needs to run first not wait for the semaphore (but still post to it when finished). You might also be able to use a condition variable, which has different semantics.

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1  
I don't think that would work without putting the mutex in a shared memory segment before the fork. The mutex otherwise gets copied in the two processes. –  Blagovest Buyukliev Aug 31 '11 at 20:13
    
@Blagovest: Good point, fixed. –  Adam Rosenfield Aug 31 '11 at 21:01
1  
Linux mutexes work perfectly fine between processes as long as they're created with the process-shared attribute. –  R.. Sep 1 '11 at 5:22
    
@R.: Another good point, I forgot about mutex attributes. The first test I did using default attributes didn't work, since mutexes are process-private by default. –  Adam Rosenfield Sep 1 '11 at 14:04
    
It used to work (with old glibc or old kernel) even without the process-shared attribute, but Linux added the private futex flag to optimize the common non-process-shared case by using the virtual address directly as the futex hash rather than resolving it to an underlying mapping. –  R.. Sep 1 '11 at 14:28

A mutex should be able to solve this problem. Lock the mutex before the call to fork and have the 1st function excute as normal, while the second tries to claim the mutex. The 1st should unlock the mutex when it is done and the second will wait until it is free.

EDIT: Mutex must be in a shared memory segment for the two processes

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And put the mutex in a shared memory segment... –  Blagovest Buyukliev Aug 31 '11 at 20:15
    
This is only valid if you create the mutex with the process-shared attribute. For programmers not familiar with thread synchronization primitives, there are much easier solutions... –  R.. Sep 1 '11 at 5:20

Safest way is to use a (named) pipe or socket. One side writes to it, the other reads. The reader cannot read what has not been written yet.

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+1 this is the simplest and most classic solution for multi-process programs, and much simpler than bringing shared memory and pthread synchronization primitives into the picture. –  R.. Sep 1 '11 at 5:21
    
The writer doesn't even have to write, it can just close it (provided that the reader has also closed it). –  Per Johansson Sep 1 '11 at 14:34
    
Solves the synchronisation problem. –  Henk Langeveld Nov 12 '11 at 23:25

Use a semphore to ensure that one starts before the other.

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You could use an atomic variable. Set it to zero before you fork/thread/exec, have the first process set it to one just before (or better, after) it enters the function, and have the second wait while(flag == 0).

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1  
That'll make your CPU spin unnecessarily, wasting power. It would be much better to use a condition variable or semaphore, which you can wait on without busy waiting. –  Adam Rosenfield Aug 31 '11 at 20:05

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