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I'm tasked with making a change to a website which I'm not sure is even possible.

We have one element which is an image surrounded by 3px padding, a 1px border, and then a drop shadow.

This is the one that works correctly

The above image is how the y would like it

These ones they want changed

This one does not look as they want it.

We have another element which is an empty div with a background color set. The designer wants these two to look the same, but I only have access to the CSS. Is there some way I can get this to look the same using pseudo selectors?

Here's the CSS:

    float: left;
    height: 23px;
    margin: 3px;
    width: 23px;
    padding:2px;
    border:1px solid #d4d4d4;
    box-shadow:3px 3px 4px rgba(0,0,0,0.1);
     -moz-box-shadow:3px 3px 4px rgba(0,0,0,0.1);
     -webkit-box-shadow:3px 3px 4px rgba(0,0,0,0.1);      
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migrated from webmasters.stackexchange.com Aug 31 '11 at 20:17

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I am trying to understand the issue better. You basically want to style the empty <div> to exactly look the way the designer wanted? You can try to target the empty <div> based on the DOM structure. –  moey Aug 31 '11 at 20:27
    
I can edit the class on the empty div. The problem is when you add padding, it only makes the div bigger. There is no way that I know of to add a white ring inside the border when the background is set short of adding a parent element, which I cannot do. I mean... I suppose I could with javascript but that is not worth the effort. –  Chris Sobolewski Aug 31 '11 at 20:31

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use the :before or :after pseudo-elements to create an extra "hook" that will allow you to add two borders to your div. Like this:

div:before {
  background: blue;
  border: 3px solid white;
  /* :before will only display if it generates content,
     but that content may be empty: */
  content: '';
  display: block;
  width: 23px;
  height: 23px;
}

div {
  float: left;
  border: 1px solid #d4d4d4;
  box-shadow: 3px 3px 4px rgba(0,0,0,0.1);
}

This essentially works as if your empty div looked like this instead:

<div><div:before> </div:before></div>

If it's just a matter of having multiple borders or shadows, though, I'd go with Doug's far simpler answer.

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You can use the outline property, which draws outside the border.

Example

background:lightblue;
height: 23px;
margin: 3px;
width: 23px;
padding:2px;
border:3px solid white;
outline:1px solid #d4d4d4;

Edit: The outline will cover your drop shadow, so add a spread value to your box-shadow properties:

box-shadow:3px 3px 4px 1px rgba(0,0,0,0.1);
-moz-box-shadow:3px 3px 4px 1px rgba(0,0,0,0.1);
-webkit-box-shadow:3px 3px 4px 1px rgba(0,0,0,0.1);   
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The outline will overlap the box-shadow, though, so you're only left with a 3 pixel shadow. You can overcome that by adding a spread radius to the shadow: box-shadow:3px 3px 4px 1px rgba(0,0,0,0.1). –  mercator Aug 31 '11 at 20:53
    
Nice... it's not every day I get to learn a new CSS property. I'm going to start using this a lot because it appears to be outside of the box-model, which is how I've always felt border should work. –  Chris Sobolewski Sep 2 '11 at 15:48
    
Interestingly, the outline renders outside of the box shadow in FF6 for Mac, so I guess I can't use this after all. –  Chris Sobolewski Sep 2 '11 at 16:15
    
OK, I did not realize that! –  Doug Sep 2 '11 at 17:57

Assuming CSS3 could be applied here, try using the new box-sizing property.

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I have used this method -

CSS

div {
    float: left;
    background: #abcdef;
    height: 23px;
    width: 23px;
    border:1px solid #d4d4d4;
}

div:after {
    position: absolute;
    top: 8px;
    left: 8px;
    content: "";
    width: 27px;
    height: 27px;
    border: 1px solid #d4d4d4;
    box-shadow:3px 3px 4px rgba(0,0,0,0.1);
     -moz-box-shadow:3px 3px 4px rgba(0,0,0,0.1);
     -webkit-box-shadow:3px 3px 4px rgba(0,0,0,0.1);
}

Example

See this

Reference

A great tutorial for a technique of this sort

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This seems overly complicated and only actually works by accident in the fiddle. Absolutely positioning the :after element means it will be stuck to the top of the page. You'd need to add position: relative to the div, at least, but then the top and left offsets need to be changed too. –  mercator Aug 31 '11 at 20:59
    
Wow... good use of position absolute... –  Chris Sobolewski Aug 31 '11 at 20:59

Dude, I totally figured out another method that is way better than the others, including the one I gave before. (I got the idea here, and it makes me feel dumb I didn't think of this before.)

You can use multiple box-shadows, like so:

.multipleBordersPlusADropShadowAsWell
{
    box-shadow: 0 0 0 3px #fff, 
                0 0 0 4px #555, 
                3px 3px 4px 4px rgba(0,0,0,0.2);
}

See example

The box shadows overlay each other with the first ones on top. The first two have zero blur and finite spread so they act like borders. The third has a blur plus spread to show up outside the first two.

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Use a bigger border: border:4px solid #ffffff;

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There is already a border of 1px solid #d4d4d4. They want three white pixels between the block of color and the border. –  Chris Sobolewski Aug 31 '11 at 20:29
    
Ok, use a 3-pixel border. This will make it look like padding. Nothing else is going to work without nesting another element. –  Diodeus Aug 31 '11 at 20:35

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