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In the book I'm reading now, Practical Programming - An Introduction to Computer Science Using Python, I've come across an example of code. I can's see what is the reason for the first cycle and the conditional check. As I see it, the second cycle alone is enough to do the same work. I've put the code through the debugger, but still can't figure out the reason for the parts I consider useless.

def largest_below_threshold(values, threshold):
'''Find the largest value below a specified threshold. If no value is
found, returns None.'''

    result = None
    #the first cycle
    for v in values:
        if v < threshold:
            result = v
            break

    #the conditional check
    if result is None:
        return None

    #the second cycle
    for v in values:
        if result < v < threshold:
            result = v
    return result

Thanks!

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3  
For that matter, the code could be return max([val for val in values if val < threshold] or [None]) or, less clever but arguably more readable big_enough = [val for val in value if val < threshold]; if big_enough: return max(big_enough); else: return None. One can also optimize it to take O(1) space by avoiding intermediate lists and working with generators, but it gets very ugly. –  delnan Aug 31 '11 at 20:22
    
Just as an FYI, in Python 3 None is not orderable. So to use just the 2nd cycle you might initialize to result = float('-inf'). –  eryksun Aug 31 '11 at 20:33
    
@eryksun: assuming this will only ever be used on arrays of floats, perhaps this is OK; for code that works on any comparable type, however, this won't work (what about strings ordered lexicographically?). –  Patrick87 Aug 31 '11 at 20:40
    
@Patrick87: True. My comment was narrowly focused based on the claim that the 2nd cycle is enough. I assumed it was relying on Python 2, in which even "abc" > None is true (i.e. PyNone is hard-coded to be less than everything). I think you'd have to code a special object in Python 3 to accomplish that in general. –  eryksun Aug 31 '11 at 20:46
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The reason for having both is that you must first establish the existence of some suitable element, in the general case, before you can ask whether a best one exists. In this code, the first loop establishes the existence of a suitable element, and the second loop can then assume this and simply look for a best one.

To change the second loop so that it does the work of the first, something like this could be done:

  def largest_below_threshold(values, threshold):
  '''Find the largest value below a specified threshold. If no value is
  found, returns None.'''

    result = None

    #the second cycle
    for v in values:
      if v < threshold:
        if result is None:
           result = v
        elif result < v:
           result = v
    return result

Note that to find e.g. the largest integer in a set of integers, you don't need the first pass since it is guaranteed that there will be an integer n such that there aren't any integers bigger than n in the list. Not true here; that there are elements in the list says nothing about whether there will be a solution (except that there might be). Note also that we have similar problems here with defining universally minimal values for comparisons... which, by establishing a baseline candidate, we avoid.

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What if all values are larger than the threshold?

What's an appropriate initial value for v in the second cycle?

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That's right, the first cycle is used to determine an initial value for v –  F.C. Aug 31 '11 at 20:38
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