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So here is an interesting problem I learned today.

I need to populate an array with the last 12 months, starting with the past month. So in August 2011, the last 12 months will be Sep 2010 - July 2011. To do this, I am using:

for ($i = 1; $i <= 12; $i++)
    $months[] = date("Y-m%", strtotime("-$i months"));

The code above works just fine on August 30. I get the last 12 months:

array
    0 => string '2011-07%' (length=8)
    1 => string '2011-06%' (length=8)
    2 => string '2011-05%' (length=8)
    3 => string '2011-04%' (length=8)
    4 => string '2011-03%' (length=8)
    5 => string '2011-02%' (length=8)
    6 => string '2011-01%' (length=8)
    7 => string '2010-12%' (length=8)
    8 => string '2010-11%' (length=8)
    9 => string '2010-10%' (length=8)
    10 => string '2010-09%' (length=8)
    11 => string '2010-08%' (length=8)

But when I run this on Aug 31, I get:

array
    0 => string '2011-07%' (length=8)
    1 => string '2011-07%' (length=8)
    2 => string '2011-05%' (length=8)
    3 => string '2011-05%' (length=8)
    4 => string '2011-03%' (length=8)
    5 => string '2011-03%' (length=8)
    6 => string '2011-01%' (length=8)
    7 => string '2010-12%' (length=8)
    8 => string '2010-12%' (length=8)
    9 => string '2010-10%' (length=8)
    10 => string '2010-10%' (length=8)
    11 => string '2010-08%' (length=8)

I have tried both Windows and Unix. Does anyone have a solution for this?

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4 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

I'm sure someone has a more elegant solution, but you could start counting backwards from the 1st of this month.

for ($i = 1; $i <= 12; $i++) {
    $months[] = date("Y-m%", strtotime( date( 'Y-m-01' )." -$i months"));
}
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I think the 'first of the month' thing is pretty necessary unless crack out some insane PHP library function (which I don't even want to do for a one line loop) and the fact that it uses well known functions in three lines very readably is what I think makes this solution a brilliant one, merci! –  lol Feb 28 '13 at 3:50
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It's because not every month has a 31st. So strtotime() is advancing to the next month. i.e. 4/31 = 5/1.

You'd be better off using mktime() for this as it's dumber than strtotime().

UPDATE

To take advantage of a smart function like strtotime() and avoid tracking the year for mktime(), the following is my suggestion:

$month = time();
for ($i = 1; $i <= 12; $i++) {
  $month = strtotime('last month', $month);
  $months[] = date("r", $month);
}
print_r($months);

Adjust logic and optimize as you see fit.

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This seems to be obvious. But why does it work in the first example for February (only 28 days) as well? –  Andreas Aug 31 '11 at 20:33
1  
Scratch that. The first example is inaccurate. I don't get that for 8/30. I get two Marches. –  Jason McCreary Aug 31 '11 at 20:36
    
No, +1 month is not 30 days. Your first explanation was correct, it just increases the 'month digit' and overflows to the first day in the next month. –  Evert Aug 31 '11 at 20:38
    
All, See update. –  Jason McCreary Aug 31 '11 at 20:43
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The problem is that, as far as PHP is concern, a month will always have 30 days, hence 31 August minus 1 month is still August. The following code may not be the most efficient or brilliant, but it does the job:

<?php

$m = strftime('%m');
$y = strftime('%Y');

for($i=1; $i<12; $i++)
{
    $m--;
    if($m <= 0)
    {
        $y--;
        $m = 12;
    }
    print "$y-$m\n";
}

?>
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2  
-1, PHP knows how many days are in a month, it does not consider 1 month as always 30 days. –  salathe Aug 31 '11 at 20:43
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The joys of different month lengths. strtotime is being literally, and taking 'Aug 31' and tryinn to make "Sep 31", which doesn't exist. So you end up with Oct 1 or something. A safer approach is this:

for ($i = 1; $i <= 12; $i++) {
    $months[] = date("Y-m%", mktime(0, 0, 0, $i, 1, 2011));
}

strtotime is magical sometimes, but it's not reliable and certainly not "fast".

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What happens when year becomes 2012? change mktime(.,.,.,.,.,date('Y')) ? –  Rohit Chopra Aug 31 '11 at 20:38
    
yes, if you need this to adjust to the current year at all times. –  Marc B Aug 31 '11 at 20:40
1  
Still doesn't work if last 12 months spans over 2 years as in the example. (i.e. 2011 - 2010) –  Jason McCreary Aug 31 '11 at 21:12
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