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I have a BusyIndicator from the wpf extended toolkit and I'm running a function that takes a while to complete. If I run the time consuming task in a separate thread, I get a NotSupportedException because I'm attemping to insert objects into an ObservableCollection from that different thread. I don't really want to spend a lot of time refactoring the code, if possible... Is there a way that I can set the visibility of the indicator in a separate thread instead?

EDIT

ThreadStart start = delegate()
  {
      System.Windows.Application.Current.Dispatcher.Invoke((Action)(() =>
          {
              IsBusy = true;
          }));
   };

new Thread(start).Start();                                
longRunningFunction();

This did not work for me either.

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I edited my answer to provide you with a solution. –  Brian Lagunas Sep 1 '11 at 1:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should be able to use the Dispatcher for things like that. e.g.

Application.Current.Dispatcher.Invoke((Action)(() =>
{
    _indicator.Visibility = Visibility.Visible;
}));

This will cause the code to be run on the UI-Thread.

There is more info (including how to "properly" do this, with CheckAccess and such) on it in the threading model reference.

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This didn't work... the busy indicator doesn't become visible: System.Windows.Application.Current.Dispatcher.Invoke((Action)(() => { IsBusy = true; })); functionThatTakesForever(); System.Windows.Application.Current.Dispatcher.Invoke((Action)(() => { IsBusy = false; })); Would the fact that I'm performing these operations in the ViewModel rather than in the codebehind have any effect on the way it behaves? –  drowned Aug 31 '11 at 21:41
    
@drowned: You are running that on a different thread, right? If you do not the UI will still block. Use the dispatcher in the background thread whenever you need to access elements owned by the UI-thread, including your ObservableCollection. –  H.B. Aug 31 '11 at 21:46
    
Perhaps I misunderstood... I'll update my question to reflect what I attempted to do. –  drowned Aug 31 '11 at 21:54
    
The long running function needs to be executed on the background thread as well of course. Otherwise the whole thing is pointless, if you were just to set the IsBusy you would not need a thread for that. –  H.B. Aug 31 '11 at 22:17
    
But when I do that, I get the exception upon attempting to insert into the collection –  drowned Sep 1 '11 at 13:38

You cannot access UI controls from a background worker. What you normally do is set the IsBusy to true before you call BackgroundWorker.RunWorkerAync(), then in the BackgroundWorker.RunWorkerCompleted event handler you would set the IsBusy to false. Seomthing like:

Backgroundworker worker = new BackgroundWorker();
worker.DoWork += ...
worker.RunWorkerCompleted += delegate(object s, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs args)
{
     IsBusy = false;
};
IsBusy = true;
worker.RunWorkerAsync();

You can use the Dispatcher to add items to your ObservableCollection while in the DoWork event hanlder.

EDIT: Here is the complete solution

        private void Button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        //on UI thread
        ObservableCollection<string> collection;

        ThreadStart start = delegate()
        {
            List<string> items = new List<string>();
            for (int i = 0; i < 5000000; i++)
            {
                items.Add(String.Format("Item {0}", i));
            }

            System.Windows.Application.Current.Dispatcher.Invoke((Action)(() =>
            {
                //propogate items to UI
                collection = new ObservableCollection<string>(items);
                //hide indicator
                _indicator.IsBusy = false;
            }));
        };
        //show indicator before calling start
        _indicator.IsBusy = true;
        new Thread(start).Start();      
    }
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The OP did not mention any use of a BackgroundWorker though... –  H.B. Aug 31 '11 at 21:01
    
This is the first thing I tried. I get the same exception when trying to insert into a collection. –  drowned Aug 31 '11 at 21:40
    
@H.B. The concepts is the same even if you aren't using the BackgroundWorker. –  Brian Lagunas Aug 31 '11 at 22:51

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