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I have problems getting Manipulate to work with code assigned to variables that should be evaluated inside the Manipulate statement. Here is how it goes ...

test1={a,b,c};
Manipulate[test1,{a,0,10,.1},{b,0,10,.1},{c,0,10,.1}]

Manipulate output 1

So {a, b, c} are not updated. Ok, whatever, let's enforce the evaluation of test1

Manipulate[Evaluate[test1],{a,0,10,.1},{b,0,10,.1},{c,0,10,.1}]

enter image description here

Now it works. But if I want to plot the list of manipulated elements, like this

Manipulate[ListPlot[Evaluate[test1]],{a,0,10,.1},{b,0,10,.1},{c,0,10,.1}]
Manipulate[Evaluate[ListPlot[test1]],{a,0,10,.1},{b,0,10,.1},{c,0,10,.1}]

I end up with

enter image description here

in both chases.

I am aware of 'Evaluate Expressions inside Dynamic or Manipulate' in Mathematica's documentation, but I am pretty sure that it does not provide a solution to my problem.

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1  
very similar question: Update Manipulated plots when parameters change –  WReach Aug 31 '11 at 23:42
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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

So the problem is that test1 is defined in terms of global variable Global`a, but the a defined in the manipulate is created by a DynamicModule and is thus local. This is what acl showed with his Hold[a] example.

Maybe the easiest way to fix this is to use With to insert test1 into the manipulate:

Clear[a, b, c]
test1 = {a, b, c};
With[{test1 = test1}, 
     Manipulate[test1, {a, 0, 10, .1}, {b, 0, 10, .1}, {c, 0, 10, .1}]]

This way the Manipulate never actually sees test1, all it sees is {a,b,c} which it then goes on to correctly localize. Although, this will run into problems if a,b,c have been given a value before the Manipulate is run - thus the Clear[a,b,c] command.

I think that the best practice is to make all local variables completely explicit in the manipulate. So you should do something like

Clear[a, b, c, test1]
test1[a_, b_, c_] := {a, b, c};
Manipulate[test1[a, b, c], {a, 0, 10, .1}, {b, 0, 10, .1}, {c, 0, 10, .1}]

This avoids problems with the global vs local variables that you were having. It also makes it easier for you when you have to come back and read your own code again.


Edit to answer the question in the comments "I really would like to understand why Evaluate does not work with the somewhat nested ListPlot?". IANLS (I am not Leonid Shifrin) and so I don't have a perfect Mathematica (non)standard evaluation sequence running in my brain, but I'll try to explain what's going on.

Ok, so unlike Plot, ListPlot does not need to localize any variables, so it does not have the Attribute HoldAll.

Let's define something similar to your example:

ClearAll[a, test]
test = {a, a + 1};

The final example you gave is like

Manipulate[Evaluate[ListPlot[test]], {a, 0, 1}]

By looking at the Trace, you see that this first evaluates the first argument which is ListPlot[test] ~> ListPlot[{a,a+1}] and since a is not yet localized, it produces an empty list plot. To see this, simply run

ListPlot[{a, a + 1}]//InputForm

to get the empty graphics object

Graphics[{}, {AspectRatio -> GoldenRatio^(-1), Axes -> True, AxesOrigin -> {0, 0}, PlotRange -> {{0., 0.}, {0., 0.}}, PlotRangeClipping -> True, PlotRangePadding -> {Scaled[0.02], Scaled[0.02]}}]

As the symbolic values a have been thrown out, they can not get localized by the Manipulate and so not much else happens.

This could be fixed by still evaluating the first argument, but not calling ListPlot until after Manipulate has localized the variables. For example, both of the following work

Manipulate[Evaluate[listPlot[test]], {a, 0, 1}] /. listPlot -> ListPlot
Manipulate[Evaluate[Hold[ListPlot][test]], {a, 0, 1}] // ReleaseHold

The fact that ListPlot throws away non-numeric values without even the slightest complaint, is probably a feature, but can lead to some annoyingly hard to track bugs (like the one this question pertains to). Maybe a more consistent (but less useful?) behaviour would be to return an unevaluated ListPlot if the plot values are non-numeric... Or to at least issue a warning that some non-numeric points have been discarded.

The penultimate example you gave is (more?) interesting, it looks like

Manipulate[ListPlot[Evaluate[test]], {a, 0, 1}]

Now since Manipulate has the attribute HoldAll, the first thing it does is wrap the arguments in Hold, so if you look at the Trace, you'll see Hold[ListPlot[Evaluate[test]]] being carried around. The Evaluate is not seen, since as described in the Possible Issues section, "Evaluate works only on the first level, directly inside a held function". This means that test is not evaluated until after the variables have been localized and so they are taken to be the global a and not the local (DynamicModule) a.

It's worth thinking about how the following variations work

ClearAll[a, test, f, g]
SetAttributes[g, HoldAll];
test = {a, a + 1};

Grid[{
  {Manipulate[test, {a, 0, 1}], Manipulate[Evaluate[test], {a, 0, 1}]},
  {Manipulate[f[test], {a, 0, 1}], 
   Manipulate[f[Evaluate[test]], {a, 0, 1}]},
  {Manipulate[g[test], {a, 0, 1}], 
   Manipulate[g[Evaluate[test]], {a, 0, 1}]}
  }]

brainpain

share|improve this answer
    
+1 In a similar vein to the With solution, one could use Manipulate[Evaluate@test1, ...]. However, I agree that the best practice is to use local variables. –  WReach Aug 31 '11 at 23:36
    
@WReach: Yeah, but the Evaluate does not work in the ListPlot version of the question... (btw +1 to your answer to a nearly identical question) –  Simon Sep 1 '11 at 0:17
    
I would like to emphasize that I've posted a minimal example in order explain the problem. In reality I am dealing with far more and changing parameters, so I don't want to write them down explicitly. +1 for the With solution (it is not a problem for me to Clear the variables). However, I really would like to understand why Evaluate does not work with the somewhat nested ListPlot? –  phantomas1234 Sep 1 '11 at 15:22
    
@phantomas1234: I understand (and appreciate) that you produced a simple example that showed the behaviour you were having problems with. Hopefully my edit is close the to mark and can help explain what's going on. –  Simon Sep 2 '11 at 2:17
    
@Simon: Awesome! 'The fact that ListPlot throws away non-numeric values ...': I totally forgot about that. Leonid could not have explained the question better than you did :-) Thank you for your extra effort. –  phantomas1234 Sep 2 '11 at 14:42
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Here is why it doesn't work:

Manipulate[
 {
  Hold[a]
  },
 {a, 0, 10, .1},
 {b, 0, 10, .1},
 {c, 0, 10, .1}
 ]

enter image description here

One may fix this in various ways. One is to simply define test1 with the localized variables, like so:

ClearAll[test1, a, b, c];
Manipulate[
 test1 = {a, b, c};
 {
  test1
  },
 {a, 0, 10, .1},
 {b, 0, 10, .1},
 {c, 0, 10, .1}
 ]

and then eg

ClearAll[test1, a, b, c];
Manipulate[
 test1 = {a, b, c};
 ListPlot@test1, 
 {a, 0, 10, .1},
 {b, 0, 10, .1},
 {c, 0, 10, .1}
 ]

works.

If you prefer to define test1 globally, this

ClearAll[test1, a, b, c];
test1 = {a, b, c};
Manipulate[
 test1,
 {a, 0, 10, .1},
 {b, 0, 10, .1},
 {c, 0, 10, .1},
 LocalizeVariables -> False,
 TrackedSymbols -> test1
 ]

works.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, but your first solutions have to Set test1 every time a change is made. This isn't much of an overhead in this case, but it's probably best to avoid. Your 2nd solution has the "problem" that {a,b,c} become global variables, which might have unwanted consequences. –  Simon Aug 31 '11 at 22:56
1  
@Simon I agree with both your points (and by the idea behind your answer that "the right way" is to not use global variables but to inject the definitions literally with With). The idea here was to minimally alter the approach given in the question so that it works. –  acl Sep 1 '11 at 11:35
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