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Common examples for a ObjC object are like this (for the header file):

@interface A: B {
    int x;
    int y;
}
@end

Is it possible to avoid the inheritance specification (i.e. B here) in the header file?


In my case, the framework A defines that class A and another (sub-)framework B defines the class B (which is a subclass of NSView). A links to B. In my application, I link to A and I don't need to know anything about B except that it is a subclass of NSView. And I want to avoid to link to B. But if B is in the header file, I think I cannot avoid it, that's why I was asking about how to avoid it.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

no.

you must often work around this with a class cluster, hold a private implementation, or create an object factory. then you can minimize the dependencies across modules.

you'll still ultimately need to link to the sub library at some stage if you intend to use it (e.g. create an instance of).

Update - Demonstrate Private Implementations

Private implementations can be entirely opaque. If you do expose them, here are two ways to implement private implementations which are visible to clients:

via protocol:

// MONDrawProtocol.h
// zero linkage required
// needs to be visible to adopt
// may be forwarded
@protocol MONDrawProtocol
- (void)drawView:(NSView *)view inRect:(NSRect)rect;
@end

// MONView.h
@protocol MONDrawProtocol;

@interface MONView : NSView
{
    NSObject<MONDrawProtocol>* drawer;
}

@end

// MONView.m

#include "MONDrawProtocol.h"

@implementation MONView

- (void)drawRect:(NSRect)rect
{
    [self.drawer drawView:self inRect:rect];
}

@end

via base:

// MONDrawer.h
// base needs to be visible to subclass and types which use MONDrawer
// may be forwarded
@interface MONDrawer : NSObject
- (void)drawView:(NSView *)view inRect:(NSRect)rect;
@end

// MONView.h
@class MONDrawer;
@interface MONView : NSView
{
    MONDrawer * drawer;
}

@end

// MONView.m

#include "MONDrawer.h"

@implementation MONView

- (void)drawRect:(NSRect)rect
{
    [self.drawer drawView:self inRect:rect];
}

@end
share|improve this answer
    
What does "private implementation" mean? Maybe that is exactly what I want / asked for here? See my own answer for my current solution which works just fine. – Albert Aug 31 '11 at 22:11
    
@Albert updated. your answer uses a factory; factories are frequently used when you must derive. – justin Aug 31 '11 at 22:37
    
This seems much complicated. After all, I still want to have that NSView. Why not use something like what I suggested in my answer? I cannot really see the advantage of your solution. – Albert Sep 1 '11 at 0:09
    
@Albert it makes a lot of sense in some cases. Apple's frameworks use private implementations (e.g. NSHTTPCookieInternal) as appropriate. if a factory works better in your specific case, then use that. – justin Sep 1 '11 at 4:27

No. You have to specify the superclass for any subclass. May I ask why you would want to do something like this?

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The superclass belongs to another independent (sub-)framework which I would not need to link to otherwise. Right now, I link only to the framework which defines the class itself. – Albert Aug 31 '11 at 21:08
1  
@Albert: If you're using a class defined in that framework (which includes subclasses defined elsewhere, since they are partially defined by their superclasses), then you need to link in the framework. There's no way around it. – Chuck Aug 31 '11 at 21:45
    
This is a bit of strange thing to want to do, you want the functionality of the frame work but you don't want to have to use it? Is your problem, you are only interested in on class and you don't like that you have to include everything else is the framework? Or do you want to subclass a class in a framework, which is not available yet, (its being developed by someone else), in which case can you create a temporary macro for the class that makes to a lower class NSObject or NSView whatever. – Nathan Day Aug 31 '11 at 22:10
    
I want to use framework A but I don't want to know about framework B. See one solution for this in my own answer. – Albert Sep 1 '11 at 0:08

Your application will need the code for B, therefore you must either link to B's framework, or compile the B framework into your A framework. Either way, you cannot use an instance of A without the code for B, and you must include B's header in your A header.

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No it does not. See my own answer as a possible solution. This solution doesn't need the code for B nor any linking to B. – Albert Aug 31 '11 at 21:41

If you don't specify a superclass in the interface, then your class is a root class. This means it doesn't inherit from any other class, so it is responsible for providing its own implementation of the required methods (most of those defined by the NSObject class and protocol). Since this is not a simple task, it is highly encouraged that you inherit from some other class which provides these methods.

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I don't want it to be a root-class. It is fine if NSObject is a superclass. It was only an example. I extended my question a bit to make it more clear. – Albert Aug 31 '11 at 21:12

Yes you can, with that you will also lost default implementations of alloc, init, etc. Which makes you write your own alloc, init and other stuffs which was there in NSObject

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Isn't it possible to reuse all the implementations? I want to have the inheritance, I just don't want to specify it in the header file. – Albert Aug 31 '11 at 21:13
    
I don't think it is possible. The only way i can see is having a copy of NSObject (or any class you want to inherit) .h and .m file and rename to the class you need and proceed. In all other cases, you will be working with two different instances, that may not give you your desired result. – Saran Aug 31 '11 at 21:28

can't you just include a mock version of the class you're inheriting from A's header itself? Not sure if that will cause problems, but it would allow you to clean up your linking requrirements a bit. B-new could then be a category of B'Original

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I have one solution now. Instead of providing the class, I just provide a function like this:

NSView* allocA();

Internally in the framework A, A is a subclass of B.

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