Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What's the best way to achieve Rails-like flash messages such as "Update successful" http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Flash.html) in the Java world? I'm using Spring MVC.

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I would recommend implementing this as a session-wide HashTable, with string keys mapping to custom FlashItem objects. The FlashItem will simply contain the object or string you're storing plus a boolean value, possibly called IsNew, which should be set to true when you insert a new item into the HashTable.

On each page load you then iterate the HashTable, set any IsNew = true items to false, and delete any items where IsNew is already false. That should give you a work-alike to Rails's flash feature.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I have done just that in Spring MVC with a session scoped bean.

public class FlashImpl implements Flash, Serializable{

private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

private static final String ERROR = "error";
private static final String WARNING = "warning";
private static final String NOTICE = "notice";

private String message;
private String klass;

public void message(String klass, String message) {
    this.klass = klass;
    this.message = message;
}

public void notice(String message) {
    this.message(NOTICE, message);
}

public void warning(String message) {
    this.message(WARNING, message);
}

public void error(String message) {
    this.message(ERROR, message);
}

public boolean isEmptyMessage() {
    return message == null;
}

public void clear() {
    this.message = null;
    this.klass = null;
}

public String getMessage() {
    String msg = message;
    this.clear();
    return msg;
}

public void setMessage(String message) {
    this.message = message;
}

public String getKlass() {
    return klass;
}

public void setKlass(String klass) {
    this.klass = klass;
}}

The trick is in consumming the message once it's been read for the first time. This way it can survive to a redirect after post.

I am assuming that there will be only one type of message for request!. If you don't want this you could create a hashmap as already suggested.

I inject this bean in my controllers (actually I inject it in a base controller inherited by all the others).

In your JSP you have to add some code like this:

<c:if test="${!flash.emptyMessage}" >
    <div class="${flash.klass}">${fn:escapeXml(flash.message)}</div>
</c:if>
share|improve this answer
add comment

This has been added to Spring MVC 3.1.RC1:

3.1.15 Flash Attributes and RedirectAttributes

Flash attributes can now be stored in a FlashMap and saved in the HTTP session to survive a redirect. For an overview of the general support for flash attributes in Spring MVC see Section 16.6, “Using flash attributes”.

In annotated controllers, an @RequestMapping method can add flash attributes by declaring a method argument of type RedirectAttributes. This method argument can now also be used to get precise control over the attributes used in a redirect scenario. See Section 16.3.3.10, “Specifying redirect and flash attributes” for more details.

(JIRA issue: SPR-6464)

share|improve this answer
    
Seriously, but that is way to late! –  SecretService Apr 5 '12 at 13:24
    
Excellent! This solved my problems described here: stackoverflow.com/questions/11216550/… –  Tommy Jun 27 '12 at 10:37
add comment

I've used Manolo Santos' example with with Spring MVC as follows:

Annotate the Flash class with @Component, and add a boolean variable to indicate if the message should live for one more request.


@Component
public class Flash {

    private static final String INFO = "info";
    private static final String SUCCESS = "success";
    private static final String ERROR = "error";
    private static final String WARNING = "warning";
    private static final String NOTICE = "notice";

    private final Map msgs = new HashMap();

    private boolean isKept;   // keep msg for one more request (when the controller method redirects to another)

    private void message(String severity, String message) {
        msgs.put(message, severity);
    }

    public void info(String message) {
        this.message(INFO, message);
    }

    public void success(String message) {
        this.message(SUCCESS, message);
    }

    public void notice(String message) {
        this.message(NOTICE, message);
    }

    public void warning(String message) {
        this.message(WARNING, message);
    }

    public void error(String message) {
        this.message(ERROR, message);
    }

    public boolean isEmptyMessage() {
        return msgs.isEmpty();
    }

    public void clear() {
        msgs.clear();
        isKept = false;
    }

    public Map getMessage() {
        return msgs;
    }

    public boolean isKept() {
        return isKept;
    }

    public void keep() {
        isKept = true;
    }

    public void unKeep() {
        isKept = false;
    }
}

Use an interceptor to add the flash message to the model object.


public class FlashMessageInterceptor extends HandlerInterceptorAdapter {

    @Resource
    Flash flash;

    @Override
    public void postHandle(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response, Object handler, ModelAndView modelAndView) throws Exception {
        if (!flash.isKept()) {
            modelAndView.addObject("flash", flash);
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void afterCompletion(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response, Object handler, Exception ex) throws Exception {
        if (flash.isKept()) {
            flash.unKeep();
        }
        else {
            flash.clear();
        }
    }
}

In your controller, if you have a method that redirects to another method you could just say; flush.keep(), to have the flash message displayed.


@Controller
public class ComputerCampLove {

    @Resource
    private Flash flash;

    @RequestMapping(method = RequestMethod.GET)
    public String takeMeToAnotherPlace(Model model) {

        flash.info("Fa-fa-fa!");
        flash.keep();

        return "redirect:somewhere";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

If you have not invested a huge amount of work into your spring java app, you could look at running rails on jruby. The beauty of running jRuby on Rails is that you can mix and match ruby gems and java libs.

If you have already put a fair amount of work into your application then this is more then likely not an option.

share|improve this answer
3  
Unfortunately I'm quite committed to Spring. –  wachunga Apr 8 '09 at 2:29
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.