Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been trying to wrap my head around this the whole day...

Basically, I have a struct called State that has a name and another one called StateMachine with a name, an array of states and total number of states added:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct State {
  const char * name;

} State;

typedef struct StateMachine {
  const char * name;

  int total_states;
  State ** states;

} StateMachine;

StateMachine * create_state_machine(const char* name) {
  StateMachine * temp;

  temp = malloc(sizeof(struct StateMachine));

  if (temp == NULL) {
    exit(127);
  }

  temp->name = name;
  temp->total_states = 0;

  temp->states = malloc(sizeof(struct State));
  return temp;
}

void destroy_state_machine(StateMachine* state_machine) {
  free(state_machine);
}

State * add_state(StateMachine* state_machine, const char* name) {
  State * temp;

  temp = malloc(sizeof(struct State));

  if (temp == NULL) {
    exit(127);
  }

  temp->name = name;

  state_machine->states[state_machine->total_states]= temp;
  state_machine->total_states++;

  return temp;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {

  StateMachine * state_machine;

  State * init;
  State * foo;
  State * bar;

  state_machine = create_state_machine("My State Machine");

  init = add_state(state_machine, "Init");
  foo  = add_state(state_machine, "Foo");
  bar  = add_state(state_machine, "Bar");

  int i = 0;

  for(i; i< state_machine->total_states; i++) {
    printf("--> [%d] state: %s\n", i, state_machine->states[i]->name);
  }

}

For some reason (read low C-fu / years of ruby/python/php) I'm unable to express the fact that states is an Array of State(s). The above code prints:

--> [0] state: ~
--> [1] state: Foo
--> [2] state: Bar

What happened with the first state added?

If I malloc the states array on the first state added (e.g. state_machine = malloc(sizeof(temp)); then I get the first value but not the second.

Any advices?

This is a C question. I'm using gcc 4.2.1 to compile the sample.

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It looks like you're not allocating space for your states in the machine past the first one.

StateMachine * create_state_machine(const char* name) {
  StateMachine * temp;

  temp = malloc(sizeof(struct StateMachine));

  if (temp == NULL) {
    exit(127);
  }

  temp->name = name;
  temp->total_states = 0;

  temp->states = malloc(sizeof(struct State)); // This bit here only allocates space for 1.
  return temp;
}

You're probably better off putting an array of states of fixed size in the state machine struct. If that's not okay, you'll have to realloc and move the whole set around or allocate chunks and keep track of the current length, or make a linked list.

Incidentally, init, foo, and bar never get used.

Edit: What I'm suggesting looks like this:

#define MAX_STATES 128 // Pick something sensible.
typedef struct StateMachine {
  const char * name;
  int total_states;
  State *states[MAX_STATES];
} StateMachine;
share|improve this answer
    
If I set that to NULL (because I won't know the size of the states when creating the StateMachine) how will I add the states? –  apann Aug 31 '11 at 21:49
    
+1 for catching that he's only allocating for one State –  Homer6 Aug 31 '11 at 21:50
    
@apann: You don't need to know the sizes of the states, only the size of a pointer to a state. Sticking an array of State * in StateMachine should work, as long as you make sure not to overrun it. –  nmichaels Aug 31 '11 at 21:53
    
Thanks, I would have up voted this but I don't have enough karma :) –  apann Sep 1 '11 at 8:22
    
@apann: Keep your question quality where it is and you'll have no trouble with rep. This is one of the best first questions I've seen. –  nmichaels Sep 1 '11 at 17:42
add comment

It looks like you want to have a variable number of states in each state machine, but you are allocating the memory incorrectly. In create_state_machine, this line:

temp->states = malloc(sizeof(struct State));

Allocates a single State object, not an array of pointers (which is how you are using it).

There are two ways you could change this.

  1. Declare states as State states[<some-fixed-size>]; but then you cant ever have more than a fixed number of states.
  2. Add another member to indicate how much storage has been allocated for states, so you can keep track of that as well as how much is used (which is what total_states is being used for).

The later would look something like this:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

typedef struct 
{
    const char *name;
} State;

typedef struct 
{
    const char *name;
    int total_states;
    int states_capacity;
    State *states;
} StateMachine;

StateMachine *create_state_machine(const char *name)
{
    StateMachine *temp = malloc(sizeof(StateMachine));
    memset(temp, 0, sizeof(*temp));

    temp->name = name;
    temp->states_capacity = 10;
    temp->states = malloc(sizeof(State) * temp->states_capacity);

    return temp;
}

State *add_state(StateMachine *machine, const char *name)
{
    if (machine->total_states == machine->states_capacity)
    {
        // could grow in any fashion.  here i double the size, could leave
        // half the memory wasted though.
        machine->states_capacity *= 2;

        machine->states = realloc(
            machine->states, 
            sizeof(State) * machine->states_capacity);
    }

    State *state = (machine->states + machine->total_states);
    state->name = name;

    machine->total_states++;

    return state;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I see this working, but I can't pick more that 1 answer :) –  apann Sep 1 '11 at 8:25
add comment

Inside of your add_state function:

temp = malloc(sizeof(struct StateMachine)); 

should be

temp = malloc(sizeof(struct State));

However, even when this is changed, I still get the proper output:

--> [0] state: Init
--> [1] state: Foo
--> [2] state: Bar

Perhaps there's nothing wrong with your code. I'm using gcc version 4.4.3

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for spotting this, I'll edit my post. However, it didn't fix the problem (I'm getting same result) –  apann Aug 31 '11 at 21:42
    
I wonder if there's a compiler flag or something that will make this work under 4.2.1 (default compiler under Snow Leopard). –  apann Sep 1 '11 at 8:24
add comment
State ** states;

will create an array of state arrays.

I haven't read through the whole solution truthfully (gotta run), but you mentioned wanting an array of states - did you possibly want to do:

State* states

or

State states[size];

instead? Just food for thought, chances are it wasn't your problem since I didn't fully read it :p

share|improve this answer
    
I've tried that as well, but I'm getting error: incompatible types in assignment when doing state_machine->states[state_machine->total_states]= temp; –  apann Aug 31 '11 at 21:45
add comment

You're doing a conceptual error:

State ** states;

It's true that you can consider states like an array of pointer to State object, but you are allocating space for just one state. When you do:

state_machine->states[state_machine->total_states]= temp;

you are doing something wrong if total_states is greater than zero because you are pointing to memory segments that are not been allocated (I'm wondering why you don't get a SEGFAULT). To store a dynamic number of State this way you need a linked list, or to call realloc every state you add(but that's not a good idea). The memory you are allocating with different malloc calls isn't continuous.

share|improve this answer
    
The segfault is probably because states are very small (only 1 word each). Were C a safer language, it would check this sort of thing. –  nmichaels Aug 31 '11 at 22:09
    
Thanks for the details, now I understand what I was doing wrong. –  apann Sep 1 '11 at 8:26
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.