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I'm messing around with the prototype chain and noticed something I can't explain. I'm still learning all of this, so it's probably a mistake i've made. I'm trying to do some multi-inheritance, like so many others. I noticed the prototype object looks a lot like a hash/dictionary, I thought, why not use something like underscore.extend to merge multiple prototype objects together as one.

function A(){this.value="A";};
A.prototype.funcA = function (){console.log(this.value);}
function B(){this.value="B";};
B.prototype.funcB = function (){console.log(this.value);}

function C(){
  // fix constructor
  this.constructor = C;
  // 'inherit' properties
  A.call(this);
  B.call(this);
};
// gobble up the prototype chains of A and B
C.prototype = new underscore.extend(A.prototype,B.prototype);
C.prototype.funcC = function (){console.log(this.value);}
var c = new C();

> c instanceof C
true
> c instanceof A
true
> c instanceof B
false

I'm really surprised to get a true at all here. Can anyone explain what's going on here?

UPDATE I removed underscore's extend method from the code, as suggested, and this works a lot better. thanks!

function extend(destination, source) {
  for (var property in source) {
    if (source.hasOwnProperty(property)) {
      destination[property] = source[property];
    }
  }
  return destination;
};

function A(){this.value="A";};
A.prototype.funcA = function (){console.log(this.value);}
function B(){this.value="B";};
B.prototype.funcB = function (){console.log(this.value);}

function C(){
  this.constructor = C;
  A.call(this);
  B.call(this);
};
var destination = {};
destination = extend(destination,A.prototype);
destination = extend(destination,B.prototype);
C.prototype = destination;
C.prototype.funcC = function (){console.log(this.value);}
var c = new C();
> c
{ constructor: [Function: C], value: 'B' }
> c instanceof A
false
> c instanceof B
false
> c instanceof C
true
share|improve this question
    
I wonder if calling the constructor from that scope marks the ancestor as 'an instance of' in the javascript engine, but I couldn't find anything to indicate that. Does it still return true if you don't call underscore.extend ? does it still return true if you don't call the parent constructors? –  Evert Aug 31 '11 at 23:02
    
What I'm wondering is why you're not seeing an error for new underscore.extend(…). extend() returns an object, not a constructor, so it shouldn't work to instantiate it with new- as far as I can tell… –  Flambino Aug 31 '11 at 23:41
    
> A.prototype { funcA: [Function], funcB: [Function], funcC: [Function] } looks the the prototype is being altered after the underscore.extend call. interesting. I'll merge them the hard way i guess :) –  Sneaky Wombat Aug 31 '11 at 23:42
    
@SneakyWombat: extend() both modifies and returns the 1st argument. So you're extending A.prototype with B.prototype, and using that very same object (A.prototype) as C.prototype, and then adding to that same object after that. So it makes sense that A.prototype contains all three func* methods. But I still don't quite understand why the new line isn't throwing a TypeError –  Flambino Aug 31 '11 at 23:50
    
i'm sure i'm doing several things here I shouldn't be, but that's how you learn right? :) thanks for all the comments/tips! –  Sneaky Wombat Aug 31 '11 at 23:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is no multiple inheritance in JavaScript, because one object can have only one prototype. To prove it is enough to see ECMAScript 5 Object.getPrototypeOf method which of course returns only one value. For older interpreters you could try __proto__ property (non-standard) of simply obj.constructor.prototype.

The example you've made give you a possibility to have all features from two different prototypes, however it brakes the prototype chain - this is why instanceof operator returns false for A and B. In fact prototypes of A or B are not prototypes of your object, but the mixin of them which you have made using the extend function. The function name is very misleading (however such name is used by some of frameworks and libraries) - because we don't extend any object (in object-oriented programming meaning) - we build a mixin of two object - which is completely different design pattern.

Bit out off topic - if you're experimenting with objects and prototypal inheritance - try to play with Object.create method (of ECMAScript 5). It's very useful in this case.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah, i initially tried to use Object.create, but it wasn't producing the results I was looking for. It's more than possible I was using it wrong though. I understand what you mean about breaking the chain and I know that there isn't multiple inheritance in JS. I was trying to fake something that felt like that in the end. I'm porting a Python library to JS and it uses a lot of class inheritance for code reuse. i'm struggling to find a pattern that does the same in JS. I've been reading the Oreilly books, JavaScript, the definitive guide and Javascript Patterns, both use ecma 5. –  Sneaky Wombat Sep 1 '11 at 16:30

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