Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been looking around for this one, and the common response to this seems to be along the lines of "they are unrelated, and one can't be substituted for the other". But say you're in an interview and get asked "When would you use a template instead of inheritance and vice versa?"

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by PengOne, bmargulies, Steve Guidi, Suma, Chris Smith Aug 31 '11 at 23:34

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
Why being on the interview has to change my will to give a correct answer to a question? –  unkulunkulu Aug 31 '11 at 23:02
5  
How is this "not a real question"? Close-happy trigger fingers irritate me. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 31 '11 at 23:20
2  
If you hear this question in an interview, it's time to say goodbye, since they are just wasting your time; and you now do the same with ours. –  Gene Bushuyev Aug 31 '11 at 23:21
    
It's a dumb interview question. At best, it's the wrong way around. You should not ask "when do you use tool X". You should ask, "here's problem J. How do you solve it?" and the answer may be "tool X". –  tenfour Aug 31 '11 at 23:34
2  
This is actually a great question. It tests the programmers ability to think abstractly about classes of problems rather than being "given" a problem. Upon finding this question it was clear exactly what was being asked, and was not vague in the slightest. Second Lightness Races in Orbit statement. Trigger-happy closing is borderline trolling. –  optikradio Mar 7 '13 at 23:28
add comment

4 Answers

The way I see it is that templates and inheritance are literally orthogonal concepts: Inheritance is "vertical" and goes down, from the abstract to the more and more concrete. A shape, a triange, an equilateral triangle.

Templates on the other hand are "horizontal" and define parallel instances of code that knowns nothing of each other. Sorting integers is formally the same as sorting doubles and sorting strings, but those are three entirely different functions. They all "look" the same from afar, but they have nothing to do with each other.

Inheritance provides runtime abstraction. Templates are code generation tools.

Because the concepts are orthogonal, they may happily be used together to work towards a common goal. My favourite example of this is type erasure, in which the type-erasing container contains a virtual base pointer to an implementation class, but there are arbitrarily many concrete implementations that are generated by a template derived class. Template code generation serves to fill an inheritance hierarchy. Magic.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this explanation. It's a little more in plain english than the others. –  Brent212 Sep 2 '11 at 5:13
    
Hmm, I'm not an expert in the matter and that's why I found this answer, but as you describe it, it seems to me that templates solve the lack of C++ for a complex inherence system like mixins (a problem, for instance, solved elegantly by Go). If ints and doubles and strings have nothing in common but need to be sorted, all three should extend in some way a "Sortable" trait. –  pistacchio Apr 4 at 7:54
    
@pistacchio: I wouldn't call complex inheritance a "solution". Templates provide sortability in a much nicer way, since the sortee doesn't need to know that it's being sorted. Complex inheritance typically results when you work with a forced mindset that everything must be an inheritance hierarchy, which is in fact rarely appropriate. Go's approach is simple, but more restrictive and less efficient. It's appropriate for the small language Go wants to be. –  Kerrek SB Apr 4 at 8:34
add comment

The "common response" is wrong. In "Effective C++," Scott Meyers says in Item 41:

Item 41: Understand implicit interfaces and compile-time polymorphism.

Meyers goes on to summarize:

  • Both classes and templates support interfaces and polymorphism.
  • For classes, interfaces are explicit and centered on function signatures. Polymorphism occurs at runtime through virtual functions.
  • For template parameters, interfaces are implicit and based on valid expressions. Polymorphism occurs during compilation through template instantiation and function overloading resolution.
share|improve this answer
    
Does he make the typo, too? :P –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 31 '11 at 23:20
    
Heh heh. I couldn't find a source to cut and paste... –  Gnawme Aug 31 '11 at 23:24
add comment

use a template in a base (or composition) when you want to retain type safety or would like to avoid virtual dispatch.

share|improve this answer
1  
Indeed, I suspect avoiding virtual dispatch via CRTP is what the interviewer was looking for. –  ildjarn Aug 31 '11 at 23:05
add comment

Templates are appropriate when defining an interface that works on multiple types of unrelated objects. Templates make perfect sense for container classes where its necessary generalize the objects in the container, yet retain type information.

In case of inheritance, all parameters must be of the defined parameter type, or extend from it. So when methods operate on object that correctly have a direct hierarchical relationship, inheritance is the best choice.

When inheritance is incorrectly applied, then it requires creating overly complex class hierarchies, of unrelated objects. The complexity of the code will increase for a small gain. If this is the case, then use templates.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.