Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've a basic login form to which I want to add some validations. I came up with these:

$errors = array();

if($_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] == 'POST'){

    if(0 === preg_match("/.+@.+\..+/", $_POST['email'])){
        $errors['email'] = "Please enter a valid email address";
    }

    if(0 === preg_match("/.{6,}/", $_POST['password'])){
        $errors['password'] = "Please enter you correct password";
    }

    if(0 === count($errors)){
      // SUBMIT THE FORM, <form action='auth.php' method='post'...
    }
}

So, how can I accomplish the last IF part, which will submit the form if there's no error? Thanks in advance

share|improve this question
5  
If you can read $_POST['email'] than the form has already been submitted. –  CaNNaDaRk Aug 31 '11 at 23:04
1  
Is this script being called by AJAX? –  Mike Aug 31 '11 at 23:09
    
no, sir. only php –  tmrhmdv Aug 31 '11 at 23:11
1  
So what do you mean by "SUBMIT THE FORM"? –  Mike Aug 31 '11 at 23:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would imagine if this code is in auth.php then you are already submitting the form.

Think of it this way: You submit the form no matter what, but stop the submission if there are errors. You process may look something like the following:

form.php

<?php 
   if($_GET['error']){ echo '<p>There was a problem with your input</p>'; }
?>
<form method="post" action="auth.php">
   <input ... />
   <button type="submit">Submit</button>
</form>

auth.php

 $errors = array();

 if($_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] == 'POST'){

     if(0 === preg_match("/.+@.+\..+/", $_POST['email'])){
         $errors['email'] = "Please enter a valid email address";
     }

     if(0 === preg_match("/.{6,}/", $_POST['password'])){
         $errors['password'] = "Please enter you correct password";
     }
 }

 if(0 === count($errors)){
   // do your form action as normal
 }
 else {
    header('Location: form.php?error=1');
    exit();
 }
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! This does it –  tmrhmdv Aug 31 '11 at 23:15
1  
I would suggest looking into the answer provided by @ShaneC as well, Javascript is better suited for 'instant feedback'. However don't rely on it on its own for validation, it is easily bypassed. –  phindmarsh Aug 31 '11 at 23:18

I think you're trying to use PHP in a situation where you need JavaScript.

If you're talking about actually submitting a <form> element on an HTML page, then you need JavaScript. PHP only fires, in this case, when the form is submitted.

If, however, your intent isn't to submit the form element and instead perform a task (or series of tasks) based on a validated form, then you would just have to include your logic appropriately.

For example:

if( count($errors) > 0 ){
  // THERE IS A PROBLEM, RETURN THE ERRORS
  include( 'myHTML.html' );
  exit();
}

// If the above didn't fire, then we have no errors
echo( "Wonderful! Now we can add this information to a database, or something." );
share|improve this answer
    
You're right. I should just validate them with javascript and disable submit button untill errors are cleared. But it would be useless if a user has JS blocked. –  tmrhmdv Aug 31 '11 at 23:11
    
Who disables JS nowadays anyway? –  yoda Aug 31 '11 at 23:12
    
Well the best thing to do is validate in both. You need to ensure what you're putting into your application is what you need (i.e a valid e-mail), so you need to do it PHP side in case there's a problem. JS just makes it easier on the user. For the PHP part of it, you should include the HTML of your form in the part where I said include( 'myHTML.html' ) and add a thing that says <?php if( isset( $errors ) ): ?>There are errors here!<?php endif; ?>. @yoda: Oh if only –  ShaneC Aug 31 '11 at 23:14
1  
@yoda: Nobody will have universally valid numbers for that, but imo you shouldn't underestimate. If a site has 100 visits/month and 1% JS-disabled users, maybe the site owner doesn't care, if only one visit cannot enjoy JS comforts (or losing that visitor because JS is a must for some reason). But when it comes to high traffic sites, the picture may change drastically. Take Yahoo! for example. If they'd ignore JS-disabled U.S. visits of their homepage, this would affect 6 million visits/month...^^ –  Jürgen Thelen Sep 1 '11 at 0:22
    
@Jürgen Thelen yes, I agree that each case should be seen as unique. –  yoda Sep 1 '11 at 0:34

I don't see a problem there. The only thing you should do is move the if-part up so it will only be called when the request method is post. Is this solving your problem? If not, please describe your problem in detail.

share|improve this answer
    
Will do sir. But what's the syntax to tell PHP to submit the form if no errors found? –  tmrhmdv Aug 31 '11 at 23:08
    
@Timur, that would depend on the type of request. –  yoda Aug 31 '11 at 23:13
    
@Timur: The form is already submitted. It's server side already. You just need to put your form processing code (ie db calls or whatever you're going to do with the submitted form) in your final IF block. –  mwan Aug 31 '11 at 23:13
    
@Timur The form is submitted when it hits the server. Your code is serverside validation. If you want to prevent the form from submitting, use clientside validation (javascript). You got some hints in the answers. –  Sgoettschkes Aug 31 '11 at 23:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.