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I have an extension method which takes in two list and compares them for modifications then outputs a new list. Here is the code

public static List<Member> GetModifiedRecords(this List<Member> LocalMemberData, List<Member> RemoteMemberData)
    {
        var result = (from localdata in LocalMemberData
                      from remotedata in RemoteMemberData
                      where
                      ((
                      localdata.Card != remotedata.Card ||
                      localdata.DateJoined != remotedata.DateJoined ||
                      localdata.DatePaidUpTo != remotedata.DatePaidUpTo ||
                      localdata.Forename != remotedata.Forename ||
                      localdata.Postcode != remotedata.Postcode ||
                      localdata.State != remotedata.State ||
                      localdata.Street != remotedata.Street ||
                      localdata.Surname != remotedata.Surname ||
                      localdata.Title != remotedata.Title ||
                      localdata.Town != remotedata.Town
                      )
                      && (localdata.MemberNumber == remotedata.MemberNumber
                      ))
                      select localdata).Distinct();

        List<Member> modifiedMembers = new List<Member>(result);
        return modifiedMembers;
    } 

What's strange is when running it fails on the line

List<Member> modifiedMembers = new List<Member>(result);

With the error

"The CLR has been unable to transition from COM context 0x3b4668 to COM context 0x3b44f8 for 60 seconds. The thread that owns the destination context/apartment is most likely either doing a non pumping wait or processing a very long running operation without pumping Windows messages. This situation generally has a negative performance impact and may even lead to the application becoming non responsive or memory usage accumulating continually over time. To avoid this problem, all single threaded apartment (STA) threads should use pumping wait primitives (such as CoWaitForMultipleHandles) and routinely pump messages during long running operations."

FYI both Lists that are being compared have over 100,000 records. Am I thinking about this wrong?

share|improve this question
3  
It's not strange that would be the line it fails on. Until then, it's just a query. Creating a list from it actually executes the query. And yes, trying to compare that many records in this manner is probably the wrong approach. – dlev Sep 1 '11 at 1:05
    
Why not just write another table that keeps a modification history record, rather than trying to detect what changed? You can add triggers that automatically append to that history table – Merlyn Morgan-Graham Sep 1 '11 at 1:22
    
Hi Merlyn, this is what I would normally do but unfortunately I am taking data from an Access database and trying to put it into a SQL Database. AFAIK Access has no triggers, so I need to do it programatically. – Coesy Sep 1 '11 at 1:46
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Consider a join, instead of filtering the cartesian product. For instance:

var r = new Random();
var list1 = Enumerable.Range(0,10000).OrderBy(_=>r.Next()).ToList();
var list2 = Enumerable.Range(0,10000).OrderBy(_=>r.Next()).ToList();
var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
var c1 = from x1 in list1 from x2 in list2 where x1==x2 select x1;
var j1 = c1.ToList();
sw.ElapsedMilliseconds.Dump();
sw=Stopwatch.StartNew();
var c2 = from x1 in list1 join x2 in list2 on x1 equals x2 select x1;
var j2 = c2.ToList();
sw.ElapsedMilliseconds.Dump();

Gives timings of

3584
1

i.e. joins are super fast (complexity O(n)), your pseudo-join isn't (complexity O(n2)).

At 100000 items, my machine choked (I quit after 5 minutes) on the cartesian product filtering approach, but completed the join in 21ms.

So, rewriting your query as follows should really turbo things up:

(from localdata in LocalMemberData
join remotedata in RemoteMemberData 
on localdata.MemberNumber equals remotedata.MemberNumber
where
(
localdata.Card != remotedata.Card ||
localdata.DateJoined != remotedata.DateJoined ||
localdata.DatePaidUpTo != remotedata.DatePaidUpTo ||
localdata.Forename != remotedata.Forename ||
localdata.Postcode != remotedata.Postcode ||
localdata.State != remotedata.State ||
localdata.Street != remotedata.Street ||
localdata.Surname != remotedata.Surname ||
localdata.Title != remotedata.Title ||
localdata.Town != remotedata.Town
)
select localdata).Distinct()
share|improve this answer
    
Just tried this and you're right, turbo fast! Amazing work, thank you. – Coesy Sep 1 '11 at 1:59
2  
It's definitely worth taking the time to understand why this is the case. Linq builds ILookup of the data to join, effectively creating an index on the inner sequence to be joined. Take a look half-way down this page: weblogs.asp.net/dixin/archive/2010/03/16/… to get a better understanding of join. – spender Sep 1 '11 at 2:08

If I understand correctly, your LINQ query will compare each element in each list with each element in the other list. That means 100,000 x 100,000 comparisons. That's 1 billion comparisons, which is a lot.

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I dont think the content of the error message is where should be focusing. I think you need to rethink your compare operation to streamline and improve the code from a standpoint of readability and execution.

Here is how I read your code, You have 2 sets: List A and List B. You want return the items from List A that exist in List B, but do not exactly match on every property.

That said, I have written and algorithm that uses a slightly simpler 'Member' model, but demonstrates the same functionality you are attempting.

public static List<Member> GetModifiedRecords(List<Member> localMemberData, List<Member> remoteMemberData )
    {
        var list = new List<Member>();
        foreach (var item in localMemberData)
        {
            var remoteItems = remoteMemberData.Where(q => q.Id == item.Id);
            if (remoteItems.Any())
            {
                var remoteItem = remoteItems.First();
                if (item.CompareTo(remoteItem) != 0) list.Add(item);
            }
        }
        return list;
    }

    public class Member : IComparable<Member>
    {
        public int Id { get; set; }
        public string Card { get; set; }
        public DateTime DateJoined { get; set; }
        public string PostalCode { get; set; }
        // TODO: add other properties

        public int CompareTo(Member other)
        {
            if (this.Card != other.Card) return 1;
            if (this.DateJoined != other.DateJoined) return 1;
            if (this.PostalCode != other.PostalCode) return 1;
            // TODO: add other properties
            return 0;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
This makes sense, I appreciate it, unfortunately I tried it and still got the same timeout error. – Coesy Sep 1 '11 at 1:47

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