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I'm looking for an algorithm to do additive color mixing for RGB values.

Is it as simple as adding the RGB values together to a max of 256?

(r1, g1, b1) + (r2, g2, b2) =
    (min(r1+r2, 256), min(g1+g2, 256), min(b1+b2, 256))
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Why do you need this? Simple addition may not always give the results you want. –  dirkgently Apr 7 '09 at 16:28
3  
Ideally it would represent color blending as if it were colored light. I may be incorrect, but I thought that's what additive color mixing represents. Maybe I'm wrong. –  Gaidin Apr 7 '09 at 16:33
    
You absolutly right, it should be min. –  Gaidin Apr 7 '09 at 16:41
    
Typically, the color channel values range from 0 to 255, not 1 to 256. –  Mr Fooz Apr 7 '09 at 17:04
    
FYI, I'm working off of this, and it refers to 256: pythonware.com/library/tkinter/introduction/… –  Gaidin Apr 7 '09 at 17:20

7 Answers 7

up vote 30 down vote accepted

It depends on what you want, and it can help to see what the results are of different methods.

If you want

Red + Black        = Red
Red + Green        = Yellow
Red + Green + Blue = White
Red + White        = White 
Black + White      = White

then adding with a clamp works (e.g. min(r1 + r2, 255)) This is more like the light model you've referred to.

If you want

Red + Black        = Dark Red
Red + Green        = Dark Yellow
Red + Green + Blue = Dark Gray
Red + White        = Pink
Black + White      = Gray

then you'll need to average the values (e.g. (r1 + r2) / 2) This works better for lightening/darkening colors and creating gradients.

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Sounds more like I want the 2nd option, thanks –  Gaidin Apr 7 '09 at 16:35

To blend using alpha channels, you can use these formulas:

r = new Color();
r.A = 1 - (1 - fg.A) * (1 - bg.A);
if (r.A < 1.0e-6) return r; // Fully transparent -- R,G,B not important
r.R = fg.R * fg.A / r.A + bg.R * bg.A * (1 - fg.A) / r.A;
r.G = fg.G * fg.A / r.A + bg.G * bg.A * (1 - fg.A) / r.A;
r.B = fg.B * fg.A / r.A + bg.B * bg.A * (1 - fg.A) / r.A;

fg is the paint color. bg is the background. r is the resulting color. 1.0e-6 is just a really small number, to compensate for rounding errors.

NOTE: All variables used here are in the range [0.0, 1.0]. You have to divide or multiply by 255 if you want to use values in the range [0, 255].

For example, 50% red on top of 50% green:

// background, 50% green
var bg = new Color { R = 0.00, G = 1.00, B = 0.00, A = 0.50 };
// paint, 50% red
var fg = new Color { R = 1.00, G = 0.00, B = 0.00, A = 0.50 };
// The result
var r = new Color();
r.A = 1 - (1 - fg.A) * (1 - bg.A); // 0.75
r.R = fg.R * fg.A / r.A + bg.R * bg.A * (1 - fg.A) / r.A; // 0.67
r.G = fg.G * fg.A / r.A + bg.G * bg.A * (1 - fg.A) / r.A; // 0.33
r.B = fg.B * fg.A / r.A + bg.B * bg.A * (1 - fg.A) / r.A; // 0.00

Resulting color is: (0.67, 0.33, 0.00, 0.75), or 75% brown (or dark orange).


You could also reverse these formulas:

var bg = new Color();
if (1 - fg.A <= 1.0e-6) return null; // No result -- 'fg' is fully opaque
if (r.A - fg.A < -1.0e-6) return null; // No result -- 'fg' can't make the result more transparent
if (r.A - fg.A < 1.0e-6) return bg; // Fully transparent -- R,G,B not important
bg.A = 1 - (1 - r.A) / (1 - fg.A);
bg.R = (r.R * r.A - fg.R * fg.A) / (bg.A * (1 - fg.A));
bg.G = (r.G * r.A - fg.G * fg.A) / (bg.A * (1 - fg.A));
bg.B = (r.B * r.A - fg.B * fg.A) / (bg.A * (1 - fg.A));

or

var fg = new Color();
if (1 - bg.A <= 1.0e-6) return null; // No result -- 'bg' is fully opaque
if (r.A - bg.A < -1.0e-6) return null; // No result -- 'bg' can't make the result more transparent
if (r.A - bg.A < 1.0e-6) return bg; // Fully transparent -- R,G,B not important
fg.A = 1 - (1 - r.A) / (1 - bg.A);
fg.R = (r.R * r.A - bg.R * bg.A * (1 - fg.A)) / fg.A;
fg.G = (r.G * r.A - bg.G * bg.A * (1 - fg.A)) / fg.A;
fg.B = (r.B * r.A - bg.B * bg.A * (1 - fg.A)) / fg.A;

The formulas will calculate that background or paint color would have to be to produce the given resulting color.


If your background is opaque, the result would also be opaque. The foreground color could then take a range of values with different alpha values. For each channel (red, green and blue), you have to check which range of alphas results in valid values (0 - 1).

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What can you do about the "division by zero" problem, if fg.A and bg.A is both 0.0? This results is f.A = 0. And then I got a division by zero problem i.e. here: r.R = fg.R * fg.A / r.A + bg.R * bg.A * (1 - fg.A) / r.A; –  nodepond Mar 7 '14 at 15:31
    
@nodepond fixed –  Markus Jarderot Mar 7 '14 at 18:44
    
How do these formulas needed to be adjusted to blend a fg color with alpha onto an opaque bg? I have my desired result color and the bg color and with that information I need to determine what the fg color needs to be. –  ubiquibacon Jul 17 at 18:50

Few points:

  • I think you want to use min instead of max
  • I think you want to use 255 instead of 256

This will give:

(r1, g1, b1) + (r2, g2, b2) = (min(r1+r2, 255), min(g1+g2, 255), min(b1+b2, 255))

However, The "natural" way of mixing colors is to use the average, and then you don't need the min:

(r1, g1, b1) + (r2, g2, b2) = ((r1+r2)/2, (g1+g2)/2, (b1+b2)/2)

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You are absolutely right... I will change my answer –  Dani van der Meer Apr 7 '09 at 16:46
    
Sorry. I am halucingating. min(a,b) will give the least value of a and b. min(a,constant) will constrain a below the constant. –  Markus Jarderot Apr 7 '09 at 16:50
    
@Markus, they are both the same! (will give the least value). –  UpTheCreek Aug 7 '12 at 8:54

Fun fact: Computer RGB values are derived from the square root of photon flux. So as a general function, your math should take that into account. The general function for this for a given channel is:

blendColorValue(a, b, t)
    return √̅(̅1̅-̅t̅)̅*̅a̅²̅ ̅+̅ ̅t̅*̅b̅²̅)

Where a and b are the colors to blend, and t is a number from 0-1 representing the point in the blend you want between a and b.

The alpha channel is different; it doesn't represent photon intensity, just the percent of background that should show through; so when blending alpha values, the linear average is enough:

blendAlphaValue(a, b, t)
    return (1-t)*a + t*b;

So, to handle blending two colors, using those two functions, the following pseudocode should do you good:

blendColors(c1, c2, t)
    ret
    [r, g, b].each n ->
        ret[n] = blendColorValue(c1[n], c2[n], t)
    ret.alpha = blendAlphaValue(c1.alpha, c2.alpha, t)
    return ret

Incidentally, I long for a programming language and keyboard that both permits representing math that (or more) cleanly (the combining overline unicode character doesn't work for superscripts, symbols, and a vast array of other characters) and interpreting it correctly. sqrt((1-t)*pow(a, 2) + t * pow(b, 2)) just doesn't read as clean.

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Thank you, this was what I was looking for when searching for color mixing algorithm. The problem with the answers above (using linear mixing of rgb-values) is that they yield unnatural looking transitions between colours, with spots that are too dark. –  James Apr 19 at 10:48
2  
Why blendColorValue(a,b,0) does not equal to a? Looks to me you don't want to divide by 2 over there? Same goes for blendAlphaValue() ? –  Leszek Apr 22 at 15:25
    
You're exactly right; the (1-t)*a + t*b does the job. I've removed it from the example above. –  Fordi Jun 1 at 2:14

Javascript function to blend rgba colors

c1,c2 and result - JSON's like c1={r:0.5,g:1,b:0,a:0.33}

    var rgbaSum = function(c1, c2){
       var a = c1.a + c2.a*(1-c1.a);
       return {
         r: (c1.r * c1.a  + c2.r * c2.a * (1 - c1.a)) / a,
         g: (c1.g * c1.a  + c2.g * c2.a * (1 - c1.a)) / a,
         b: (c1.b * c1.a  + c2.b * c2.a * (1 - c1.a)) / a,
         a: a
       }
     } 
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Could this be modified to handle more than two colors? –  Kerndog73 Mar 7 at 5:07
    
Or would you just rgbaSum(rgbaSum(c1,c2),rgbaSum(c3,c4)). Would that be accurate? –  Kerndog73 Mar 7 at 5:09

Yes, it is as simple as that. Another option is to find the average (for creating gradients).

It really just depends on the effect you want to achieve.

However, when Alpha gets added, it gets complicated. There are a number of different methods to blend using an alpha.

An example of simple alpha blending: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpha_compositing#Alpha_blending

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PYTHON COLOUR MIXING THROUGH ADDITION IN CMYK SPACE

One possible way to do this is to first convert the colours to CMYK format, add them there and then reconvert to RGB.

Here is an example code in Python:

rgb_scale = 255
cmyk_scale = 100


def rgb_to_cmyk(self,r,g,b):
    if (r == 0) and (g == 0) and (b == 0):
        # black
        return 0, 0, 0, cmyk_scale

    # rgb [0,255] -> cmy [0,1]
    c = 1 - r / float(rgb_scale)
    m = 1 - g / float(rgb_scale)
    y = 1 - b / float(rgb_scale)

    # extract out k [0,1]
    min_cmy = min(c, m, y)
    c = (c - min_cmy) 
    m = (m - min_cmy) 
    y = (y - min_cmy) 
    k = min_cmy

    # rescale to the range [0,cmyk_scale]
    return c*cmyk_scale, m*cmyk_scale, y*cmyk_scale, k*cmyk_scale

def cmyk_to_rgb(self,c,m,y,k):
    """
    """
    r = rgb_scale*(1.0-(c+k)/float(cmyk_scale))
    g = rgb_scale*(1.0-(m+k)/float(cmyk_scale))
    b = rgb_scale*(1.0-(y+k)/float(cmyk_scale))
    return r,g,b

def ink_add_for_rgb(self,list_of_colours):
    """input: list of rgb, opacity (r,g,b,o) colours to be added, o acts as weights.
    output (r,g,b)
    """
    C = 0
    M = 0
    Y = 0
    K = 0

    for (r,g,b,o) in list_of_colours:
        c,m,y,k = rgb_to_cmyk(r, g, b)
        C+= o*c
        M+=o*m
        Y+=o*y 
        K+=o*k 

    return cmyk_to_rgb(C, M, Y, K)

The result to your question would then be (assuming a half-half mixture of your two colours:

r_mix, g_mix, b_mix = ink_add_for_rgb([(r1,g1,b1,0.5),(r2,g2,b2,0.5)])

where the 0.5's are there to say that we mix 50% of the first colour with 50% of the second colour.

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