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I am trying to create a program that uses fork() to create a new process. The sample output should look like so:

This is the child process. My pid is 733 and my parent's id is 772.
This is the parent process. My pid is 772 and my child's id is 773.

This is how I coded my program:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main() {
    printf("This is the child process. My pid is %d and my parent's id is %d.\n", getpid(), fork());

    return 0;
}

This results in the output:

This is the child process. My pid is 22163 and my parent's id is 0.
This is the child process. My pid is 22162 and my parent's id is 22163.

Why is it printing the statement twice and how can I get it to properly show the parent's id after the child id displays in the first sentence?

EDIT:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main() {
int pid = fork();

if (pid == 0) {
    printf("This is the child process. My pid is %d and my parent's id is %d.\n", getpid(), getppid());
}
else {
    printf("This is the parent process. My pid is %d and my parent's id is %d.\n", getpid(), pid);
}

return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Your program doesn't try to print the words "parent process" anywhere. They are not present in the program text, why do you expect them to be printed? –  n.m. Sep 1 '11 at 3:10
3  
man fork. Read it. Understand the words. Go to StackOverflow when you don't have any means to find the answer yourself. You will be a better programmer for this experience. –  asveikau Sep 1 '11 at 3:13
1  
Also, fork does not return a parent process ID to the child. It returns 0 to the child and child's ID to the parent. That's how you know which is which. –  n.m. Sep 1 '11 at 3:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Start by reading the fork man page as well as the getppid / getpid man pages.

From fork's

On success, the PID of the child process is returned in the parent's thread of execution, and a 0 is returned in the child's thread of execution. On failure, a -1 will be returned in the parent's context, no child process will be created, and errno will be set appropriately.

So this should be something down the lines of

if ((pid=fork())==0){
    printf("yada yada %u and yada yada %u",getpid(),getppid());
}
else{ /* avoids error checking*/
    printf("Dont yada yada me, im your parent with pid %u ", getpid());
}

As to your question:

This is the child process. My pid is 22163 and my parent's id is 0.

This is the child process. My pid is 22162 and my parent's id is 22163.

fork() executes before the printf. So when its done, you have two processes with the same instructions to execute. Therefore, printf will execute twice. The call to fork() will return 0 to the child process, and the pid of the child process to the parent process.

You get two running processes, each one will execute this instruction statement:

printf ("... My pid is %d and my parent's id is %d",getpid(),0); 

and

printf ("... My pid is %d and my parent's id is %d",getpid(),22163);  

~

To wrap it up, the above line is the child, specifying its pid. The second line is the parent process, specifying its id (22162) and its child's (22163).

share|improve this answer
    
And it prints twice because... (from fork's man): After a new child process is created, both processes will execute the next instruction following the fork() system call. Therefore, we have to distinguish the parent from the child. This can be done by testing the returned value of fork() –  Icarus Sep 1 '11 at 3:16
    
Thanks so much, this was a GREAT breakdown. I edited my revised code above. It seems to work properly. Would you mind double checking to see that my logic is correct? –  raphnguyen Sep 1 '11 at 3:47
    
@raphnguyen Everyone should call getppid() to get their parent's process id. In your sample, the parent process will print its child process id instead. –  Tom Sep 1 '11 at 3:50

It is printing twice because you are calling printf twice, once in the execution of your program and once in the fork. Try taking your fork() out of the printf call.

share|improve this answer

It is printing the statement twice because it is printing it for both the parent and the child. The parent has a parent id of 0

Try something like this:

 pid_t  pid;
 pid = fork();
 if (pid == 0) 
    printf("This is the child process. My pid is %d and my parent's id is %d.\n", getpid(),getppid());
 else 
    printf("This is the parent process. My pid is %d and my parent's id is %d.\n", getpid(), getppid() );
share|improve this answer

This is the correct way for getting the correct output.... However, childs parent id maybe sometimes printed as 1 because parent process gets terminated and the root process with pid = 1 controls this orphan process.

 pid_t  pid;
 pid = fork();
 if (pid == 0) 
    printf("This is the child process. My pid is %d and my parent's id 
      is %d.\n", getpid(), getppid());
 else 
     printf("This is the parent process. My pid is %d and my parent's 
         id is %d.\n", getpid(), pid);
share|improve this answer

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