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This is quite a lengthy file, but seeing as I cannot isolate a problem within it I have no choice but to include it in it's entirety.

The problem as mentioned in the actual file is that there are two main portions, a "Canvas drawing technique" involving a couple of functions, and also a validation piece. I simply cannot get them both do work inside the same JS file though honestly it's likely I'll end up splitting them up I'd still like to know where I'm making my mistake.

I've poured over countless pages of javascript function sytax tutorials. http://www.w3schools.com/js/js_functions.asp etc.

Not that I believe it matters, but the file is "script.php" so as to be recognized by my webserver so I can more easily pull PHP variables for use in the canvas draw. Thanks again for all the help.

EDIT: Finally, can anyone recommend a good IDE for doing work like this in Scripting Languages / Javascript that will inform me of simple syntax errors?

EDIT 2 : Console message is saying...

canvas is null
[Break On This Error] if (canvas.getContext){ 

is an else required when something like this is happening? i would think that if "registeredUsers" then canvas = null, which sets the IF to false and it simply should SKIP everything inside the IF condition.

$(document).ready(function(){

    <?php
    include '../functions.php';
    PrintRecentRegistrations();
    // this merely prints three variables as follows.
    //var oneWeek = 0;
    //var oneMonth = 1;
    //var oneDay = 1;
    ?>

    var base = 141;
    var top = 0;

    function GetRelativeSize(a)
    {
        if (a <= 10)
        {
        a = a * 2;
        a = 140-a;
        return a;
        }
        if (10 < a <= 50)
        {
        a = 40 + a;
        a = 140-a;
        return a;
        }
        else
        {
        a = 40 + a * .8;
        a = 140-a;
        return a;
        }
    }

    /***** If I comment out this canvas work, the Validation below works. 
    If I don't, the canvase works but the Validation doesn't.   ******/
    var canvas = document.getElementById("registeredUsers");
    if (canvas.getContext){
        var ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");

        var img = new Image();
        img.onload = function() {
        ctx.drawImage(img, 0, 0);

        ctx.beginPath();
        ctx.moveTo(52, base);
        ctx.lineTo(52, GetRelativeSize(oneDay));
        ctx.lineTo(82, GetRelativeSize(oneDay));
        ctx.lineTo(82, base);

        ctx.moveTo(112, base);
        ctx.lineTo(112, GetRelativeSize(oneWeek));
        ctx.lineTo(142, GetRelativeSize(oneWeek));
        ctx.lineTo(142, base);

        ctx.moveTo(172, base);
        ctx.lineTo(172, GetRelativeSize(oneMonth));
        ctx.lineTo(202, GetRelativeSize(oneMonth));
        ctx.lineTo(202, base);

        ctx.fillStyle = "#00FF00";
        ctx.fill();
        ctx.stroke();
        }
        img.src = "/img/chart-background.png";
    };

  $('#started-raining').delay(16500).fadeOut('slow', function() {
    $('#finished-raining').fadeIn('slow');
    })

$(':input:visible:enabled:first').focus();

// validate signup form on keyup and submit
$("#signupForm").validate({
    rules: {
        firstname: {
            required: true,
            minlength: 3
        },
        tosagree: {
            required: true,
        },
        lastname: {
            required: true,
            minlength: 3
        },
        username: {
            required: true,
            minlength: 5
        },
        password: {
            required: true,
            minlength: 5
        },
        phonenumber: {
            required: true,
            minlength: 10
        },
        confirm_password: {
            required: true,
            minlength: 5,
            equalTo: "#password"
        },
        email: {
            required: true,
            email: true
        },
        topic: {
            required: "#newsletter:checked",
            minlength: 2
        },
        agree: "required"
    },
    messages: {
        firstname: {
            required: "Required",
            minlength: "3 Characters Minimum"
        },
        phonenumber: {
            required: "Required",
            minlength: "10 digit numbers only"
        },
        lastname: {
            required: "Required",
            minlength: "3 Characters Minimum"
        },
        tosagree: {
            required: "Resistance is futile",
        },
        username: {
            required: "Required",
            minlength: "5 Characters Minimum"
        },
        password: {
            required: "Please provide a password",
            minlength: "5 Characters Minimum"
        },
        confirm_password: {
            required: "Please provide a password",
            minlength: "5 Characters Minimum",
            equalTo: "Does not match"
        },
        email: "Invalid E-mail",
    }
})

// propose username by combining first- and lastname
$("#username").focus(function() {
    var firstname = $("#firstname").val();
    var lastname = $("#lastname").val();
    if(firstname && lastname && !this.value) {
        this.value = firstname + "." + lastname;
    }
    });
});
share|improve this question
1  
Have you checked your browser's error console to see what it says? – bcoughlan Sep 1 '11 at 3:17
    
Yeah definitely split them up to separate file, then firebug can help you with the syntax. If you put them into separate .js file, Eclipse IDE with a Javascript Plugin could help as well – momo Sep 1 '11 at 3:18
    
@waitinforatrain Didn't even think about an error console. :( Just checked it though, and the only thing that it's saying is #signupForm is not a function (on pages where #signupForm doesn't exist) and also that canvas is null (on pages where I'm not printing the canvas). – Kulingar Sep 1 '11 at 3:25
1  
Read this site about using W3Schools – epascarello Sep 1 '11 at 3:47
    
@epascarello Good read, I'll take note of some of the things I read there though as the guide says other resources exist, it's much harder to remember a "reputable" site for each technology or language. – Kulingar Sep 1 '11 at 3:54

One things sticks, out, this is wrong:

if (10 < a <= 50)

It's syntactically fine, but Javascript interprets it like this:

((10 < a) <= 50)

The first expression will be 1 or 0, which will always be less than 50, so it will be true even if a is less than 10.

What you want is:

if (10 < a && a <= 50)

That's probably not what's causing the problem you're seeing, though, because it's syntactically correct even if it's semantically wrong. Sorry, this isn't really an answer to your question, but it was too long to reasonably write as a comment.

EDIT: One thing that's closer to an answer: you're missing a semicolon just before the last statement in your code.

EDIT 2: Also, some browsers don't like a final comma before the end of an array declaration. I usually do it anyway when I'm just coding away, but a guy I work with (who does a lot more Javascript than I do) always insists I clean those up whenever something's not working right, in case that's related to the cause.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I'm so used to C++. :) – Kulingar Sep 1 '11 at 3:28
    
Check out the missing semicolon. – Nate C-K Sep 1 '11 at 3:32
    
C++ would interpret that the same tho...also javascript has auto-semicolons so var a = 10 runs and executes the same as var b = 20;. Strongly recommend NOT omitting the semicolons, but, it will usually end up fine except for a couple corner cases. – jyore Sep 1 '11 at 3:33
    
@jyore Really? I'm certain I've evaluated a conditional expression like that before (10 < x < 20) Maybe it was in a math class? haha. – Kulingar Sep 1 '11 at 3:38
    
Good point about the implicit semicolons, I forgot about that. – Nate C-K Sep 1 '11 at 3:38

You trailing commas in your code that will stop some browsers.

required: "Resistance is futile",  <-- trailing comma
email: "Invalid E-mail",  <-- trailing comma. 

Also you can really simplify GetRelativeSize so it does not have so much repeated code!

function GetRelativeSize(a){
    if (a <= 10){
        var b = a * 2;
    }
    else if (a <= 50){
        b = 40 + a;
    }
    else{
        b = 40 + a * .8;
    }
    return 140 - b;
}

So much cleaner and smaller! if/else if/else is your friend!

share|improve this answer
    
JSLint would complain about this all day long and is technically bad syntax, but I have never actually seen it break anything. – jyore Sep 1 '11 at 3:46
    
@jyore, have you not coded for IE7? – epascarello Sep 1 '11 at 3:49
    
@epascarello Thanks for the edit. I had originally had 1 return statement but when I was debugging I changed it around and forgot to change it back. Thanks. :) – Kulingar Sep 1 '11 at 3:56
    
I have, but I generally don't put in the trailing comma, so I maybe just never noticed it. Also possible that I've forgotten as lately, most of my web development has been specific applications, for which I distribute a webkit browser to use and don't support anything else. I hate that IE has to suck so bad and drag down the advancement of web applications because we have to support it – jyore Sep 1 '11 at 4:03

Everything in JavaScript is global with the only closure being inside functions. Therefore importing a script will give you access to variables, functions, etc within those scripts.

You shouldn't have a problem with using anything between scripts or within the same scripts unless you are enclosing your variables within functions.

Note that this can lead to variable collisions if you do use the same variable names inside your scripts (again, unless they are inside functions).

As far as an IDE, why not just use your web browser and a web inspector. If you use Firefox, download a plugin called firebug. Chrome and I believe Safari have built in inspectors. A web inspector is a must for web development. It allows you to view every element in DOM, all resources, scripts, cookies, and they also have a console. The console will give you an error output for syntax, DOM exceptions, and other errors. You could also use something called JSLint, which is a very picky syntax checker.

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, thanks for the insight. No collisions that I'm aware of, I just needed an easy way to pull PHP variables into the JS file. Which I used by making the script file a .php file and calling the GetNewRegistrations() function which actually echos (var oneWeek = $oneWeek) so as to "convert" the PHP variables int JavaScript variables. I use firebug but typically only to track CSS. the Script tab is giving no noticeable error. – Kulingar Sep 1 '11 at 3:33
    
the error would be in the console...script is just for viewing the scripts added to your page. – jyore Sep 1 '11 at 3:37
    
Ah, I see the console tab now. Same as the additional addon I already downloaded. Not showing anything unexpected (I mentioned what it is saying in another comment above.) – Kulingar Sep 1 '11 at 3:41

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