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Is there a way to perform updates on a PIVOTed table in SQL Server 2008 where the changes propagate back to the source table, assuming there is no aggregation?

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4 Answers 4

this is just a guess, but can you make the query into a view and then update it?

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  Gonzalo.- Aug 31 '12 at 0:33
    
@ElVieejo, thanks for your cut-n-paste comment. However, I disagree with you analysis of my answer. –  KM. Aug 31 '12 at 12:53
    
you're welcome. You're asking, not aswering :) –  Gonzalo.- Aug 31 '12 at 13:02
    
@ElVieejo, OP doesn't provide any details about their tables. Under certain circumstances, you can issue an UPDATE on a view (it depends on details not provided). If I had enough table info, and it was doable, I'd provide a working example. –  KM. Sep 5 '12 at 21:04

I don't believe that it is possible, but if you post specifics about the actual problem that you're trying to solve someone might be able to give you some advice on a different approach to handling it.

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PIVOTs always require an aggregate function in the pivot clause.

Thus there is always aggregation.

So, no, it cannot be updatable.

You CAN put an INSTEAD OF TRIGGER on a view based on the statement and thus you can make any view updatable.

Example here

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How could I use the INSTEAD OF trigger to update the original table? –  brian Apr 21 '09 at 15:01
    
Example here: sqlteam.com/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=120679 –  Cade Roux Apr 21 '09 at 15:45
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This will only really work if the pivoted columns form a unique identifier. So let's take Buggy's example; here is the original table:

TaskID    Date    Hours

and we want to pivot it into a table that looks like this:

TaskID    11/15/1980    11/16/1980    11/17/1980 ... etc.

In order to create the pivot, you would do something like this:

DECLARE @FieldList NVARCHAR(MAX)

SELECT
    @FieldList =
    CASE WHEN @FieldList <> '' THEN 
    	@FieldList + ', [' + [Date] + ']' 
    ELSE 
    	'[' + [Date] + ']' 
    END
FROM
    Tasks



DECLARE @PivotSQL NVARCHAR(MAX)
SET @PivotSQL = 
    '
    	SELECT 
    		TaskID
    		, ' + @FieldList + '
    	INTO
    		##Pivoted
    	FROM 
    		(
    			SELECT * FROM Tasks
    		) AS T
    	PIVOT
    		(
    			MAX(Hours) FOR T.[Date] IN (' + @FieldList + ') 
    		) AS PVT
    '

EXEC(@PivotSQL)

So then you have your pivoted table in ##Pivoted. Now you perform an update to one of the hours fields:

UPDATE
    ##Pivoted
SET
    [11/16/1980 00:00:00] = 10
WHERE
    TaskID = 1234

Now ##Pivoted has an updated version of the hours for a task that took place on 11/16/1980 and we want to save that back to the original table, so we use an UNPIVOT:

DECLARE @UnPivotSQL NVarChar(MAX)
SET @UnPivotSQL = 
    '
    	SELECT
    		  TaskID
    		, [Date]
    		, [Hours]
    	INTO 
    		##UnPivoted
    	FROM
    		##Pivoted
    	UNPIVOT
    	(
    		Value FOR [Date] IN (' + @FieldList + ')
    	) AS UP

    '

EXEC(@UnPivotSQL)

UPDATE
    Tasks
SET
    [Hours] = UP.[Hours]
FROM
    Tasks T
INNER JOIN
    ##UnPivoted UP
ON
    T.TaskID = UP.TaskID

You'll notice that I modified Buggy's example to remove aggregation by day-of-week. That's because there's no going back and updating if you perform any sort of aggregation. If I update the SUNHours field, how do I know which Sunday's hours I'm updating? This will only work if there is no aggregation. I hope this helps!

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