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I was wondering if it is possible to route to something like this /:user_id user_id is a custom id that doesn't just use integers it uses other characters like so NM-001. Then in my controller I have @user = User.find(params[:user_id]). Then in view <%= @user.name %>

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Yes that is possible. Is this user_id string the primary key in your table or not? If it's not your primary key, you have to use find_by_user_id instead of find. If it is you primary key, you have to tell your User model that the primary key is user_id instead of id. –  Mischa Sep 1 '11 at 5:49
    
@mischa user_id is not my primary key. So I will now go try out what you said –  camelCaseD Sep 1 '11 at 5:55

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes, you can have such a route. However, if your :user_id will contain periods then you'll want to include

:constraints => { :user_id => /.*/ }

in the route options to keep Rails from trying to interpret the .whatever part of the :user_id as a format specifier.

Then, you'll get params[:user_id] in your controller and you can turn that into an object however you want. You'd probably want to do what mischa said in the comments:

@user = User.find_by_user_id(params[:user_id])

Also, if you really want to use /:user_id as your route, you'll want to make sure that none of your userids match any of your present or future top-level routes.

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When I try this in my controller @user = User.find(params[:user_id]) then in my view <%= @user.name %> my routes resources :users match '/:user_id', :to => 'users#show' it returns the error Couldn't find User without an ID –  camelCaseD Sep 3 '11 at 0:34
    
@Leozar100: Your controller should be using find_by_user_id as mischa noted in yesterday's comments. –  mu is too short Sep 3 '11 at 1:09
    
Oh now I see find_by_user_id method uses the params[:user_id] as an arguement. Thx –  camelCaseD Sep 3 '11 at 1:15

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