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Perhaps it's the time, perhaps it's me drowning in sparse documentation and not being able to wrap my head around the concept of updating in Mongoose :)

Here's the deal:

I have a contact schema and model (shortened properties):

var     mongoose = require('mongoose'),
        Schema = mongoose.Schema;

var     mongooseTypes = require("mongoose-types"),
        useTimestamps = mongooseTypes.useTimestamps;


var ContactSchema = new Schema({
    phone: { type: String, index: { unique: true, dropDups: true } },
    status: { type: String, lowercase: true, trim: true, default: 'on' }
});
ContactSchema.plugin(useTimestamps);
mongoose.model('Contact', ContactSchema); //is this line superflous??
var Contact = mongoose.model('Contact', ContactSchema);

I receive a request from the client, containing the fields I need and use my model thusly:

mongoose.connect(connectionString);
var contact = new Contact({
        phone: request.phone,
        status: request.status
    });

And now we reach the problem:

  1. If I call contact.save(function(err){...}) I'll receive an error if the contact with the same phone number already exists (as expected - unique)
  2. I can't call update() on contact, since that method does not exist on a document
  3. If I call update on the model:
    Contact.update({phone:request.phone}, contact, {upsert: true}, function(err{...})
    I get into an infinite loop of some sorts, since the Mongoose update implementation clearly doesn't want an object as the second parameter.
  4. If I do the same, but in the second parameter I pass an associative array of the request properties {status: request.status, phone: request.phone ...} it works - but then I have no reference to the specific contact and cannot find out its createdAt and updatedAt properties.

So the bottom line, after all I tried: given a document contact, how do I update it if it exists, or add it if it doesn't?

Thanks for your time.

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What about hooking in the pre for save? –  Shamoon Sep 17 '11 at 2:15
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7 Answers

I just burned a solid 3 hours trying to solve the same problem. Specifically, I wanted to "replace" the entire document if it exists, or insert it otherwise. Here's the solution:

var contact = new Contact({
  phone: request.phone,
  status: request.status
});

// Convert the Model instance to a simple object using Model's 'toObject' function
// to prevent weirdness like infinite looping...
var upsertData = contact.toObject();

// Delete the _id property, otherwise Mongo will return a "Mod on _id not allowed" error
delete upsertData._id;

// Do the upsert, which works like this: If no Contact document exists with 
// _id = contact.id, then create a new doc using upsertData.
// Otherwise, update the existing doc with upsertData
Contact.update({_id: contact.id}, upsertData, {upsert: true}, function(err{...});

I created an issue on the Mongoose project page requesting that info about this be added to the docs.

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Documentation seems poor at the moment. There is some in the API docs (search for "update" on the page. Looks like this: MyModel.update({ age: { $gt: 18 } }, { oldEnough: true }, fn); and MyModel.update({ name: 'Tobi' }, { ferret: true }, { multi: true }, fn); –  CpILL Mar 15 '12 at 17:57
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You were close with

Contact.update({phone:request.phone}, contact, {upsert: true}, function(err{...})

but your second parameter should be an object with a modification operator for example

Contact.update({phone:request.phone}, {$set: { phone: request.phone }}, {upsert: true}, function(err{...})
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6  
I don't think you need the {$set: ... } part here as its automatic form my reading –  CpILL Mar 15 '12 at 17:59
1  
Yeah, mongoose says it turns everything into $set –  grantwparks Apr 1 '12 at 23:18
    
This was valid at the time of it's writing, I don't use MongoDB anymore so I can't speak to changes in recent months :D –  chrixian Apr 2 '12 at 18:45
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up vote 15 down vote accepted

Well, I waited long enough and no answer. Finally gave up the whole update/upsert approach and went with:

ContactSchema.findOne({phone: request.phone}, function(err, contact) {
    if(!err) {
        if(!contact) {
            contact = new ContactSchema();
            contact.phone = request.phone;
        }
        contact.status = request.status;
        contact.save(function(err) {
            if(!err) {
                console.log("contact " + contact.phone + " created at " + contact.createdAt + " updated at " + contact.updatedAt);
            }
            else {
                console.log("Error: could not save contact " + contact.phone);
            }
        });
    }
});

Does it work? Yep. Am I happy with this? Probably not. 2 DB calls instead of one.
Hopefully a future Mongoose implementation would come up with a Model.upsert function.

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This examples uses the interface added in MongoDB 2.2 to specify the multi and the upsert options in a document form. .. include:: /includes/fact-upsert-multi-options.rst The documentation is stating this, don't know where to go from here. –  Donald Derek Apr 21 '13 at 23:38
    
Although this should work, you are now running 2 operations (find, update) when only 1 (upsert) is needed. @chrixian shows the correct way to do this. –  respectTheCode Apr 27 '13 at 12:45
    
there is one command findByIdAndUpdate, have you tried this? –  Nam Nguyen Sep 17 '13 at 18:48
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I needed to update/upsert a document into one collection, what I did was to create a new object literal like this:

notificationObject = {
    user_id: user.user_id,
    feed: {
        feed_id: feed.feed_id,
        channel_id: feed.channel_id,
        feed_title: ''
    }
};

composed from data that I get from somewhere else in my database and then call update on the Model

Notification.update(notificationObject, notificationObject, {upsert: true}, function(err, num, n){
    if(err){
        throw err;
    }
    console.log(num, n);
});

this is the ouput that I get after running the script for the first time:

1 { updatedExisting: false,
    upserted: 5289267a861b659b6a00c638,
    n: 1,
    connectionId: 11,
    err: null,
    ok: 1 }

And this is the output when I run the script for the second time:

1 { updatedExisting: true, n: 1, connectionId: 18, err: null, ok: 1 }

I'm using mongoose version 3.6.16

Sorry about my English this is my first answer.

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Your english is pretty good if you ask me. +1 for taking the effort to run the example. –  verybadalloc Nov 24 '13 at 10:03
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ContactSchema.connection.findOne({phone: request.phone}, function(err, contact) {
    if(!err) {
        if(!contact) {
            contact = new ContactSchema();
            contact.phone = request.phone;
        }
        contact.status = request.status;
        contact.save(function(err) {
            if(!err) {
                console.log("contact " + contact.phone + " created at " + contact.createdAt + " updated at " + contact.updatedAt);
            }
            else {
                console.log("Error: could not save contact " + contact.phone);
            }
        });
    }
});

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Comments use mini-Markdown formatting –  Lun Sep 13 '11 at 2:35
1  
Not sure what you did here... –  Traveling Tech Guy Sep 14 '11 at 23:51
    
Although this should work, you are now running 2 operations (find, update) when only 1 (upsert) is needed. @chrixian shows the correct way to do this. –  respectTheCode Apr 27 '13 at 12:44
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After reading the posts above, I decided to use this code:

    itemModel.findOne({'pid':obj.pid},function(e,r){
        if(r!=null)
        {
             itemModel.update({'pid':obj.pid},obj,{upsert:true},cb);
        }
        else
        {
            var item=new itemModel(obj);
            item.save(cb);
        }
    });

if r is null, we create new item. Otherwise, use upsert in update because update does not create new item.

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This coffeescript works for me with Node - the trick is that the _id get's stripped of its ObjectID wrapper when sent and returned from the client and so this needs to be replaced for updates (when no _id is provided, save will revert to insert and add one).

app.post '/new', (req, res) ->
    # data needed to be sent as params by $http and becomes .query
    data = req.query
    coll = db.collection 'restos'
    data._id = ObjectID(data._id) if data._id
    coll.save data, {safe:true}, (err, result) ->
        console.log("error: "+err) if err
        console.log(result)
        return res.send 500, err if err
        # return res.send 200, {res:result}
        return res.send 200, JSON.stringify result
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