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I have the following code, which checks for the number of rows in the database.

private void checkMMSRows(){
    Cursor curPdu = getContentResolver().query(Uri.parse("content://mms/part"), null, null, null, null);
    if (curPdu.moveToNext()){
        int number = curPdu.getCount();
        System.out.println(number);
    }
}

I will to run this code every second and do something when the value has changed. The problems is, how do I go about "detecting" the change? Any help would be appreciated.

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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Very basically, add a class variable - you can either make it static across all instances of the class, or an instance variable (by removing the static keyword).

Each time you get a number, you can compare it to oldNumber. After the comparison, set the oldNumber to the current number - so you have something to compare against next time:

private static int oldNumber = -1;
private void checkMMSRows(){
    Cursor curPdu = getContentResolver().query(Uri.parse("content://mms/part"), null, null, null, null);
    if (curPdu.moveToNext()){
        int number = curPdu.getCount();
        System.out.println(number);
        if(number != oldNumber){
            System.out.println("Changed");
            // add any code here that you want to react to the change
        }
        oldNumber = number;
    }
}

Update:

My answer's a straight code hack & slash solution, but I'd probably recommend amit's answer.

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Does the method keep on checking or it only checks once and that's it? –  androidnoob Sep 5 '11 at 1:00
    
@androidnoob It checks after each time you call getCount() - so yes, each time. –  Mikaveli Sep 5 '11 at 10:57
    
oldNumber = number; number cannot be resolved to a variable, do i need to declare it as a global variable? –  androidnoob Sep 6 '11 at 0:41
    
It's declared on this line int number = curPdu.getCount(); - two lines before the conditional statement. If you're trying to access number outside of if (curPdu.moveToNext()){ ... } then you'll need to change its scope. –  Mikaveli Sep 6 '11 at 8:14
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Depends on the context in which this is run. Assuming that the Object which this method belongs to will live between different checks, all you need to do is to add a int currentValue field to the object, store the value in there first time you check, and then compare the value with the stored ones in subsequent checks (and update if necessary)

int currentValue = 0;
private void checkMMSRows(){
    Cursor curPdu = getContentResolver().query(Uri.parse("content://mms/part"), null, null, null, null);
    if (curPdu.moveToNext()){
        int newValue = curPdu.getCount();
        if (newvalue != currentValue) {
               //detected a change
               currentValue = newValue;
        }
        System.out.println(newValue);
    }
}
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+1. More or less my answer, but you got there a few seconds earlier. :) –  Mikaveli Sep 1 '11 at 8:22
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you can regsister a braodcastreceiver for new coming mms and this way you will come to know that the change has taken place..

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Instead of checking every second if your element was changed, you might want to consider an alternative: allow only special access to this element, and do something once it is changed.

This this is a well known design pattern and is called the Observer Pattern.

This is a well-proven design pattern, which will make your code more readable, and will probably also enhance performance, and correctness of your application.

EDIT:
In java, you can use the Observer interface and Observable class in order to do so.

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2  
+1. Good approach, but it may help to write a simplified explanation - depending on how 'noob' the OP is. –  Mikaveli Sep 1 '11 at 8:25
1  
@Mikaveli: I added links to the Observer interface and Observable class in java.util, and I think after reading the wiki page, and the javadocs for these classes, implementing this pattern shouldn't be too hard. –  amit Sep 1 '11 at 8:35
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