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How can I preserve single and double quotes when running a command using exec?

#!/bin/sh

CMD="erl -eval 'erlang:display("foo")'"
exec $CMD

Tried with backslashes, but didn't help. For example, if I do what it would sound ovious to me:

#!/bin/sh

CMD="erl -eval 'erlang:display(\"foo\")'"
echo $CMD
exec $CMD

I get as output of the echo exactly what I want, but the command is not executed correctly when using exec.

I'm working on Snow Leopard.

Any help?

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2  
Don't Do That. mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/050 –  tripleee Sep 1 '11 at 9:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try using an array:

CMD=(erl -eval 'erlang:display("foo")')
echo "${CMD[@]}"
"${CMD[@]}"
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Just what I was typing too. You seem to have missed the single quotes in the argument though - it looks like the OP wanted single quotes around that last argument: \''erlang:display("foo")'\' –  camh Sep 1 '11 at 11:24
    
Hmm, doubt it, but let the OP speak. –  glenn jackman Sep 1 '11 at 12:11

It will work if you use eval instead of exec, if this is the last thing in your script it won't make a huge difference operationally...

#!/bin/sh

CMD="erl -eval 'erlang:display(\"foo\")'"
echo $CMD
eval $CMD
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