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I'm trying to create a static file server in nodejs more as an exercise to understand node than as a perfect server. I'm well aware of projects like Connect and node-static and fully intend to use those libraries for more production-ready code, but I also like to understand the basics of what I'm working with. With that in mind, I've coded up a small server.js:

var http = require('http'),
    url = require('url'),
    path = require('path'),
    fs = require('fs');
var mimeTypes = {
    "html": "text/html",
    "jpeg": "image/jpeg",
    "jpg": "image/jpeg",
    "png": "image/png",
    "js": "text/javascript",
    "css": "text/css"};

http.createServer(function(req, res) {
    var uri = url.parse(req.url).pathname;
    var filename = path.join(process.cwd(), uri);
    path.exists(filename, function(exists) {
        if(!exists) {
            console.log("not exists: " + filename);
            res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'});
            res.write('404 Not Found\n');
            res.end();
        }
        var mimeType = mimeTypes[path.extname(filename).split(".")[1]];
        res.writeHead(200, mimeType);

        var fileStream = fs.createReadStream(filename);
        fileStream.pipe(res);

    }); //end path.exists
}).listen(1337);

My question is twofold

  1. Is this the "right" way to go about creating and streaming basic html etc in node or is there a better/more elegant/more robust method ?

  2. Is the .pipe() in node basically just doing the following?

.

var fileStream = fs.createReadStream(filename);
fileStream.on('data', function (data) {
    res.write(data);
});
fileStream.on('end', function() {
    res.end();
});

Thanks everyone!

share|improve this question
2  
I wrote a module that lets you do that without compromsing flexibility. It also automatically caches all your resources. Check it out: github.com/topcloud/cachemere –  Jon Nov 25 '13 at 5:09

7 Answers 7

up vote 23 down vote accepted
  • Your basic server looks good, except:

    There is a return statement missing.

    res.write('404 Not Found\n');
    res.end();
    return; // <- Don't forget to return here !!
    

    And:

    res.writeHead(200, mimeType);

    should be:

    res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type':mimeType});

  • Yes pipe() does basically that, it also pauses/resumes the source stream (in case the receiver is slower). Here is the source code of the pipe() function: https://github.com/joyent/node/blob/master/lib/stream.js

share|improve this answer
    
awesome - thanks for the corrections Stewe. –  slapthelownote Sep 1 '11 at 10:41
2  
what will happen if file name is like blah.blah.css ? –  darkyen00 Feb 14 '12 at 8:03
2  
mimeType shall be blah in that case xP –  darkyen00 Feb 14 '12 at 8:03
4  
Isn't that the rub though? if you write your own, you are asking for these types of bugs. Good learning excerise but I am learning to appreciate "connect" rather than rolling my own. The problem with this page is people are looking just to find out how to do a simple file server and stack overflow comes up first. This answer is right but people aren't looking for it, just a simple answer. I had to find out the simpler one myself so put it here. –  Jason Sebring Aug 22 '12 at 21:57
    
+1 for not pasting a link to a solution in the form of a library but actually writing an answer the question. –  Shawn Whinnery Jul 28 at 21:07

This seems easier and it has some nice extras if you need them.

Just go command prompt first on your project and use

$ npm install express

Then write your app.js code like so:

var express = require('express'),
app = express(),
port = process.env.PORT || 4000;

app.use(express.static(__dirname + '/public'));
app.listen(port);

You would then create a "public" folder where you place your files. I tried it the harder way first but you have to worry about mime types which is just having to map stuff which is time consuming and then worry about response types, etc. etc. etc.... no thank you.

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1  
+1 There's a lot to be said for using tested code instead of rolling your own. –  jcollum Jan 21 '13 at 18:41
    
I tried looking at the documentation, but can't seem to find much, can you explain what your snippet is doing? I tried to use this particular variation and I don't know what can be replaced with what. –  onaclov2000 Jan 31 '13 at 15:58
1  
If you want the directory listing, simply add .use(connect.directory('public')) right after the connect.static line, replacing public, with your path. Sorry for the hijacking, but I think it clears things up for me. –  onaclov2000 Jan 31 '13 at 16:03
1  
@JasonSebring Why require('http') at the second line? –  XiaoPeng Nov 18 at 5:41
1  
@ffleandro not anymore –  Jason Sebring Dec 5 at 17:28

I like understanding what's going on under the hood as well.

I noticed a few things in your code that you probably want to clean up:

  • It crashes when filename points to a directory, because exists is true and it tries to read a file stream. I used fs.lstatSync to determine directory existence.

  • It isn't using the HTTP response codes correctly (200, 404, etc)

  • While MimeType is being determined (from the file extension), it isn't being set correctly in res.writeHead (as stewe pointed out)

  • To handle special characters, you probably want to unescape the uri

  • It blindly follows symlinks (could be a security concern)

Given this, some of the apache options (FollowSymLinks, ShowIndexes, etc) start to make more sense. I've update the code for your simple file server as follows:

var http = require('http'),
    url = require('url'),
    path = require('path'),
    fs = require('fs');
var mimeTypes = {
    "html": "text/html",
    "jpeg": "image/jpeg",
    "jpg": "image/jpeg",
    "png": "image/png",
    "js": "text/javascript",
    "css": "text/css"};

http.createServer(function(req, res) {
  var uri = url.parse(req.url).pathname;
  var filename = path.join(process.cwd(), unescape(uri));
  var stats;

  try {
    stats = fs.lstatSync(filename); // throws if path doesn't exist
  } catch (e) {
    res.writeHead(404, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'});
    res.write('404 Not Found\n');
    res.end();
    return;
  }


  if (stats.isFile()) {
    // path exists, is a file
    var mimeType = mimeTypes[path.extname(filename).split(".").reverse()[0]];
    res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': mimeType} );

    var fileStream = fs.createReadStream(filename);
    fileStream.pipe(res);
  } else if (stats.isDirectory()) {
    // path exists, is a directory
    res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'});
    res.write('Index of '+uri+'\n');
    res.write('TODO, show index?\n');
    res.end();
  } else {
    // Symbolic link, other?
    // TODO: follow symlinks?  security?
    res.writeHead(500, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'});
    res.write('500 Internal server error\n');
    res.end();
  }

}).listen(1337);
share|improve this answer
2  
can i suggest "var mimeType = mimeTypes[path.extname(filename).split(".").reverse()[0]];" instead? some filenames have more than one "." eg "my.cool.video.mp4" or "download.tar.gz" –  unsynchronized Jun 4 at 12:20

I made a httpServer function with extra features for general usage based on @Jeff Ward answer

  1. custtom dir
  2. index.html returns if req === dir

Usage:

httpServer(dir).listen(port);

https://github.com/kenokabe/ConciseStaticHttpServer

Thanks.

share|improve this answer

How about this pattern, which avoids checking separately that the file exists

        var fileStream = fs.createReadStream(filename);
        fileStream.on('error', function (error) {
            response.writeHead(404, { "Content-Type": "text/plain"});
            response.end("file not found");
        });
        fileStream.on('end', function() {
            console.log('sent file ' + filename);
            response.end("");
        });
        fileStream.pipe(response);

not sure if the response.end is really needed, but it doesn't seem to cause problems...

share|improve this answer
    
you forgot the mimetype in case of success. I'm using this design, but instead of immediatly piping the streams, I'm piping them in the 'open' event of the filestream : writeHead for the mimetype, then pipe. The end isn't needed : readable.pipe. –  GeH Apr 9 at 21:25

the st module makes serving static files easy. Here is an extract of README.md:

var mount = st({ path: __dirname + '/static', url: '/static' })
http.createServer(function(req, res) {
  var stHandled = mount(req, res);
  if (stHandled)
    return
  else
    res.end('this is not a static file')
}).listen(1338)
share|improve this answer

@JasonSebring answer pointed me in the right direction, however his code is outdated. Here is how you do it with the newest connect version.

var connect = require('connect'),
    serveStatic = require('serve-static'),
    serveIndex = require('serve-index');

var app = connect()
    .use(serveStatic('public'))
    .use(serveIndex('public', {'icons': true, 'view': 'details'}))
    .listen(3000);

In connect GitHub Repository there are other middlewares you can use.

share|improve this answer
    
I just used express instead for a simpler answer. The newest express version has the static baked in but not much else. Thanks! –  Jason Sebring Dec 5 at 14:07
    
Looking at connect documentation, it is only a wrapper for middleware. All the other interesting middleware are from express repository, so technically you could use those APIs using the express.use(). –  ffleandro Dec 5 at 17:27

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