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I've written a small script that I needed to rename and sort files in the same folder where the script is. It renames the files into integers (1, 2, 3, 4, ...) based on the last modification of files:

import os
import sys
def gtime(nam):
    return os.path.getmtime('./'+nam)
files = os.listdir('.')
files.remove(str(sys.argv[0])[2:])
files = sorted(files, key=gtime)
for fi in range(len(files)):
    os.rename('./'+files[fi], './'+str(fi+1))

That was the best I've come up with to do so... The problem is when there's a duplicate (e.g. a file already named 1, maybe from a previous sort) it just removes it.. How can I prevent this from happening?? Is there any modification I can do to the code or a better alternative way???

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2  
Why do you need to do this? The answer to your "how?" will be informed by the answer to "why?". –  MattH Sep 1 '11 at 9:24
    
a friend of mine has some folders that contains files (sort of records or documentation files) and needs to keep the older ones up... Maybe other script may add to those older files so a pattern is needed to distinguish how new the file was modified, and I thought renaming them that way will be much easier... –  amyassin Sep 1 '11 at 9:47
1  
Surely it would be easier to use a file browser that is sorting by mod time? –  MattH Sep 1 '11 at 9:52
    
it would be easier unless u wanna do something else automatically after sorting to certain files... –  amyassin Sep 1 '11 at 10:33
1  
The sorting by mod time ought to be implemented in the "something else automatically". If you seriously need to present a bunch of files to another process that are sequentially named by mod time then I'd recommend copying to a new directory with a prefix + zero padded number filename (e.g. "./inputfile-001"). You'll be less likely to destroy data that way. –  MattH Sep 1 '11 at 10:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't rename one file after the other, as you might overwrite already sorted files during the process. You can however use temporary names first and then rename the files to their final names in a second pass:

import os
import sys
def gtime(nam):
    return os.path.getmtime('./'+nam)
files = os.listdir('.')
files.remove(str(sys.argv[0])[2:])
files = sorted(files, key=gtime)
for fi, file in enumerate(files):
    os.rename(file, str(fi+1)+".tmp")
for fi in range(len(files)):
    os.rename(str(fi+1)+".tmp", str(fi+1))

(untested)

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good idea! dunno how it didn't come to my mind... thnx –  amyassin Sep 1 '11 at 10:35
    
thanks @Niklas ,, it worked –  amyassin Sep 2 '11 at 13:19

So here's an example that will copy to a subdirectory and avoid copying your script's .pyc file as well.

import os, sys
from os.path import exists, isfile, getmtime, join as pjoin
from shutil import copyfile

targetdir='process'
stub='inputfile'

if not exists(targetdir):
  os.mkdir(targetdir)

files = [ x for x in os.listdir('.') if isfile(pjoin('.',x)) and not x.startswith(sys.argv[0]) ]
pad = len(files)/10 + 1
for i,f in enumerate(sorted(files,key=lambda x: getmtime(pjoin('.',x)))):
  copytarget = pjoin('.',targetdir,"%s-%0.*d" % (stub,pad,i))
  print "Copying %s to %s" % (f,copytarget)
  copyfile(f,copytarget)
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+1 for avoiding the .pyc file... I didn't know about it and wondered why another copy of the script appears... –  amyassin Sep 2 '11 at 10:05
    
@amyassin: I don't really get what you mean by "avoiding the .pyc file"? Those files are just temporarily created by CPython and will happily be recreated if removed. –  Niklas B. Sep 2 '11 at 14:23
    
@Niklas sometimes (and I dunno exactly when) when I do the sorting thing, when renaming first it is renamed and is given a new name and is sorted as it was a file, so i get another file (a copy -not exact- of the script)... I'm trying to read more about that but by and not x.startswith(sys.argv[0]) it is resolved... –  amyassin Sep 2 '11 at 15:42
1  
@Niklas: I added the startswith entry so that if a .pyc exists, e.g. while the script is running, it will not be included in the files that are copied/renamed. –  MattH Sep 2 '11 at 16:16
1  
@MattH: I admit that this is pretty far-sighted :) +1 for that. –  Niklas B. Sep 2 '11 at 17:27
import os.path
for fi in range(len(files)):
    if os.path.exists(str(fi+1)):
        print("Prevent that from happening") # whatever you want to do here
    else:
        os.rename(files[fi], str(fi+1))
share|improve this answer
    
how to prevent that from happening ?? –  amyassin Sep 1 '11 at 9:48

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