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There are a plethora of questions where people talk about common tricks, notably "Vim+ctags tips and tricks".

However, I don't refer to commonly used shortcuts that someone new to Vim would find cool. I am talking about a seasoned Unix user (be they a developer, administrator, both, etc.), who thinks they know something 99% of us never heard or dreamed about. Something that not only makes their work easier, but also is COOL and hackish. After all, Vim resides in the most dark-corner-rich OS in the world, thus it should have intricacies that only a few privileged know about and want to share with us.

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closed as not constructive by Kev Nov 16 '11 at 0:44

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71 Answers 71

I use MacVim, which has tabs, and I'm obsessive about never leaving my keyboard. But MacVim tabs are sort of bolted onto the underlying Vim, and so are not quite equivalent to buffers. However, using a few mappings it can be done.

"switch tabs using left / right arrow keys
map <Right> :tabnext<Enter>
map <Left> :tabprevious<Enter>

Also, this might be the most overlooked feature Vim has had for a long time: :help netrw

It might be common sense, but I used Vim for many years until finding out about the Netrw plugin. I spend more time editing remote than local files, so vim over ssh tunnels is something I couldn't live without!

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Reuse

Motions to mix with other commands, more here.

tx
fx
Fx

Use your favorite tools in Vim.

:r !python anything you want or awk or Y something

Repeat in visual mode, powerful when combined with tips above.

;
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In Insert mode 
<C-A>   - Increments the number under cursor 
<C-X>   - Decrements the number under cursor

It will be very useful if we want to generate sequential numbers in vim
Lets say if we want to insert lines 1-10 with numbers from 1 to 10 [like "1" on 1st line,"2" on 2nd line..]
insert "0" on the first line and copy the line and past 9 times So that all lines will show "0".

Run the following Ex command

:g/^/exe "norm " . line(".") . "\<C-A>"
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Try using perltidy for formatting by = normal-mode command

:set equalprg=perltidy
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In insert mode, ctrl+x, ctrl+p will complete (with menu of possible completions if that's how you like it) the current long identifier that you are typing.

if (SomeCall(LONG_ID_ <-- type c-x c-p here
            [LONG_ID_I_CANT_POSSIBLY_REMEMBER]
             LONG_ID_BUT_I_NEW_IT_WASNT_THIS_ONE
             LONG_ID_GOSH_FORGOT_THIS
             LONG_ID_ETC
             ∶
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Mappings to make movements operate on the current screen line in wrap mode. I discovered this in a comment for a Vim tip some time ago, and it has proven quite handy.

function! ScreenMovement(movement)
  if &wrap
    return "g" . a:movement
  else
    return a:movement
  endif
endfunction
onoremap <silent> <expr> j ScreenMovement("j")
onoremap <silent> <expr> k ScreenMovement("k")
onoremap <silent> <expr> 0 ScreenMovement("0")
onoremap <silent> <expr> ^ ScreenMovement("^")
onoremap <silent> <expr> $ ScreenMovement("$")
nnoremap <silent> <expr> j ScreenMovement("j")
nnoremap <silent> <expr> k ScreenMovement("k")
nnoremap <silent> <expr> 0 ScreenMovement("0")
nnoremap <silent> <expr> ^ ScreenMovement("^")
nnoremap <silent> <expr> $ ScreenMovement("$")
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Mine is using macros instead of searches - combining a macro with visual mode is sometimes more efficient.

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per this thread

To prefix a set of lines I use one of two different approaches:

One approach is the block select (mentioned by sth). In general, you can select a rectangular region with ctrl-V followed by cursor-movement. Once you've highlighted a rectangle, pressing shift-I will insert characters on the left side of the rectangle, or shift-A will append them on the right side of the rectangle. So you can use this technique to make a rectangle that includes the left-most column of the lines you want to prefix, hit shift-I, type the prefix, and then hit escape.

The other approach is to use a substitution (as mentioned by Brian Agnew). Brian's substitution will affect the entire file (the % in the command means "all lines"). To affect just a few lines the easiest approach is to hit shift-V (which enables visual-line mode) while on the first/last line, and then move to the last/first line. Then type:

:s/^/YOUR PREFIX/

The ^ is a regex (in this case, the beginning of the line). By typing this in visual line mode you'll see '<,'> inserted before the s automatically. This means the range of the substitution will be the visual selection.

Extra tip: if your prefix contains slashes, you can either escape them with backslash, or you can use a different punctuation character as the separator in the command. For example, to add C++ line comments, I usually write:

:s:^:// :

For adding a suffix the substitution approach is generally easier unless all of your lines are exactly the same length. Just use $ for the pattern instead of ^ and your string will be appended instead of pre-pended.

If you want to add a prefix and a suffix simultaneously, you can do something like this:

:s/.*/PREFIX & SUFFIX/

The .* matches the whole line. The & in the replacement puts the matched text (the whole line) back, but now it'll have your prefix and suffix added.

BTW: when commenting out code you'll probably want to uncomment it later. You can use visual-block (ctrl-V) to select the slashes and then hit d to delete them, or you can use a substitution (probably with a visual line selection, made with shift-V) to remove the leading slashes like this:

:s:// ::

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Neither of the following is really diehard, but I find it extremely useful.

Trivial bindings, but I just can't live without. It enables hjkl-style movement in insert mode (using the ctrl key). In normal mode: ctrl-k/j scrolls half a screen up/down and ctrl-l/h goes to the next/previous buffer. The µ and ù mappings are especially for an AZERTY-keyboard and go to the next/previous make error.

imap <c-j> <Down>
imap <c-k> <Up>
imap <c-h> <Left>
imap <c-l> <Right>
nmap <c-j> <c-d>
nmap <c-k> <c-u>
nmap <c-h> <c-left>
nmap <c-l> <c-right>

nmap ù :cp<RETURN>
nmap µ :cn<RETURN>

A small function I wrote to highlight functions, globals, macro's, structs and typedefs. (Might be slow on very large files). Each type gets different highlighting (see ":help group-name" to get an idea of your current colortheme's settings) Usage: save the file with ww (default "\ww"). You need ctags for this.

nmap <Leader>ww :call SaveCtagsHighlight()<CR>

"Based on: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/736701/class-function-names-highlighting-in-vim
function SaveCtagsHighlight()
    write

    let extension = expand("%:e")
    if extension!="c" && extension!="cpp" && extension!="h" && extension!="hpp"
    	return
    endif

    silent !ctags --fields=+KS *
    redraw!

    let list = taglist('.*')
    for item in list
    	let kind = item.kind

    	if     kind == 'member'
    		let kw = 'Identifier'
    	elseif kind == 'function'
    		let kw = 'Function'
    	elseif kind == 'macro'
    		let kw = 'Macro'
    	elseif kind == 'struct'
    		let kw = 'Structure'
    	elseif kind == 'typedef'
    		let kw = 'Typedef'
    	else
    		continue
    	endif

    	let name = item.name
    	if name != 'operator=' && name != 'operator ='
    		exec 'syntax keyword '.kw.' '.name
    	endif
    endfor
    echo expand("%")." written, tags updated"
endfunction

I have the habit of writing lots of code and functions and I don't like to write prototypes for them. So I made some function to generate a list of prototypes within a C-style sourcefile. It comes in two flavors: one that removes the formal parameter's name and one that preserves it. I just refresh the entire list every time I need to update the prototypes. It avoids having out of sync prototypes and function definitions. Also needs ctags.

"Usage: in normal mode, where you want the prototypes to be pasted:
":call GenerateProptotypes()
function GeneratePrototypes()
    execute "silent !ctags --fields=+KS ".expand("%")
    redraw!
    let list = taglist('.*')
    let line = line(".")
    for item in list
    	if item.kind == "function"  &&  item.name != "main"
    		let name = item.name
    		let retType = item.cmd
    		let retType = substitute( retType, '^/\^\s*','','' )
    		let retType = substitute( retType, '\s*'.name.'.*', '', '' ) 

    		if has_key( item, 'signature' )
    			let sig = item.signature
    			let sig = substitute( sig, '\s*\w\+\s*,',        ',', 	'g')
    			let sig = substitute( sig, '\s*\w\+\(\s)\)', '\1', '' )
    		else
    			let sig = '()'
    		endif
    		let proto = retType . "\t" . name . sig . ';'
    		call append( line, proto )
    		let line = line + 1
    	endif
    endfor
endfunction


function GeneratePrototypesFullSignature()
    "execute "silent !ctags --fields=+KS ".expand("%")
    let dir = expand("%:p:h");
    execute "silent !ctags --fields=+KSi --extra=+q".dir."/* "
    redraw!
    let list = taglist('.*')
    let line = line(".")
    for item in list
    	if item.kind == "function"  &&  item.name != "main"
    		let name = item.name
    		let retType = item.cmd
    		let retType = substitute( retType, '^/\^\s*','','' )
    		let retType = substitute( retType, '\s*'.name.'.*', '', '' ) 

    		if has_key( item, 'signature' )
    			let sig = item.signature
    		else
    			let sig = '(void)'
    		endif
    		let proto = retType . "\t" . name . sig . ';'
    		call append( line, proto )
    		let line = line + 1
    	endif
    endfor
endfunction
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My favourite recipe to switch back and forth between windows:

function! SwitchPrevWin()
    let l:winnr_index = winnr()
    if l:winnr_index > 1
       let l:winnr_index -= 1
    else
       "set winnr_index to max window open
        let l:winnr_index = winnr('$')
    endif
    exe l:winnr_index . "wincmd w" 
endfunction

nmap <M-z> :call SwitchPrevWin()
imap <M-z> <ESC>:call SwitchPrevWin()

nmap <C-z> :wincmd w
imap <C-z> <ESC>:wincmd w
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1  
<c-w><left> or <c-w><right>… it's not that awful. –  zmo Nov 24 '14 at 15:23

I'd like to arrange some of my own config files in after-directory. It's especially useful for ftplugin.

You can avoid to write a long list of augroup in your .vimrc file instead of separate files for each type.

But, obviously, .vim/ftplugin directory do the same thing as .vim/after/ftplugin, but I'd prefer to leave .vim directory to vim plugins.

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