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I have a simple scenario. I'd like to create a new instance of the class below.

class A implements Fancy {
    void my() {
        Fancy b = // new X(); where X could be A or B
    }
}

When you have a B which implements Fancy as well.

share|improve this question
2  
What is the question exactly? Why can't you just say Fancy b = new B() if B implements Fancy? – Ashkan Aryan Sep 1 '11 at 10:58
1  
Because I dont want a B always I want the type that is running my. – rapadura Sep 1 '11 at 11:02
    
Still not clear what you want! – Ashkan Aryan Sep 1 '11 at 11:03
1  
Do you know the keyword this in Java? It refers to the running object. I want to instantiace a class of the same type as the running object. Do you understand now? – rapadura Sep 1 '11 at 11:05
    
@antonioP upvoting... this can be useful... – amod0017 Sep 2 '11 at 13:37
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Create an abstract class AbstractFancy with a create method:

abstract class AbstractFancy implements Fancy {
    abstract Fancy create();

    void my() {
        Fancy b = create();
        //....
    }
}

In each class implement the create method:

class A extends AbstractFancy {
    Fancy create() {
        return new A();
    }
}
class B extends AbstractFancy {
    Fancy create() {
        return new B();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
A implements Fancy implies that Fancy is an interface, not an abstract class. – Matt Ball Sep 1 '11 at 11:02
    
I edited that minutes ago! Please refresh.. ;) – dacwe Sep 1 '11 at 11:03
    
No, you didn't ... – Thilo Sep 1 '11 at 11:07
    
@Thilo: I changed Fancy to an abstract class so that I could add the create method directly. Updated anyways... – dacwe Sep 1 '11 at 11:15
    
@dacwe your classes A and B should extend AbstractFancy, not Fancy. – Jesper Sep 1 '11 at 11:29

I'm assuming you want my() to be defined in a base class, like a FancyAdapter, which has different child classes, and you want it to create an instance of the actual concrete child class. If you can assume that all classes implementing Fancy have a default (no-argument) constructor:

Fancy b = (Fancy) getClass().newInstance();
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class A implements Fancy {
    void my() {
        Fancy b = (Fancy)getClass().newInstance();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Reflectively? (not recommended)

Fancy b = this.getClass().newInstance();

This will work if there is a zero-argument based constructor (implicit or explicit). Make sure you do a try {} catch{} around the statement.

Other way:

class A implements Fancy, Cloneable {

    void my() {
        try {
            Fancy b = (Fancy) clone();
        } catch (CloneNotSupportedException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

Alternatively, you would want a Builder that creates a new Fancy object.

share|improve this answer
    
This will try to implement the interface Fancy -- no good. – Ernest Friedman-Hill Sep 1 '11 at 11:00
    
Oops, it's an interface? sorry.... – Buhake Sindi Sep 1 '11 at 11:03

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