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I am trying to construct a Java File object based on a user provided file name (could be absolute or relative) and a environment dependent base directory. The java doc for java.io.File(File parent, String child) says the following:

If the child pathname string is absolute then it is converted into a relative pathname in a system-dependent way.

That made me think that if I have the following code:

public class TestClass {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
        File file = new File(new File("C:/Temp"),"C:/Temp/file.txt");
        System.out.println(file.getAbsolutePath());
    }
}

the output would be

C:\Temp\file.txt

and then I'd be in business because it would not really matter anymore if the user provided an absolute or relative path. But in fact, the output is

C:\Temp\C:\Temp\file.txt

Which means I have to figure out the exact relative path (or at least test different options to see if the file exists). Am I misunderstanding the JavaDoc?

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The child pathname has to be a relative pathname. The conversion talks about slashes vs. backslashes, I think. In your case, you'd have to figure out if the path is absolute before you proceed. –  Thilo Sep 1 '11 at 11:37
    
Is the behaviour the same if you use the (more correct) "C:\\Temp" and "C:\\Temp\\file.txt" instead of using forward-clashes? I don't have a Windows PC with a JDK installed here at the moment, so I can't test this. Also: what does new File("C:/Temp").isAbsolute() print? –  Joachim Sauer Sep 1 '11 at 11:38
    
@Joachim: Both "C:/Temp" and "C:\\Temp" are treated the same. new File("C:/Temp").isAbsolute() prints true. –  Geert Sep 1 '11 at 12:03
    
@Joachim - isAbsolute returns true for all the four paths - no matter which slash is used –  Carlos Heuberger Sep 1 '11 at 12:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If the child pathname string is absolute then it is converted into a relative pathname in a system-dependent way.

I assume this means that even if you provide an absolute path, it will be converted to (in a system dependent way), and treated as, a relative path.

Which means I have to figure out the exact relative path (or at least test different options to see if the file exists).

Yes, I believe so.

This could perhaps be easily done with

file.getAbsolutePath().startsWith(parent.getAbsolutePath());

to check if it is an absolute path to a directory in parent, and

file.getAbsolutePath().substring(parent.getAbsolutePath().length());

to get the relative part.

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Hmm, you could be right when saying the absolute path is treated as a relative path (it's certainly what it looks like). That would be a shame (and poor JavaDoc imho ;-)). I'll mess about with your suggestions a bit to see what works for me, thanks! –  Geert Sep 1 '11 at 12:14

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