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what's the best way to localize a database table, holding for example a Country?

1 Flat Table

CountryID|Code|NameEN|NameIT
----------------------------
1        |IT  |Italy |Italia

SELECT CountryID, Code, NameEN AS Name
FROM Countries

2 Joined Tables

CountryID|Code
--------------
1        |IT

CountryID|LocalizationCode|Name
---------------------------------
1        |EN              |Italy
---------------------------------
2        |IT              |Italia

SELECT CountryID, Code, Name
FROM Countries INNER JOIN CountriesLoc ON Countries.CountryID = CountriesLocs.CountryID
WHERE LocalizationCode = 'EN'

Thank you!

share|improve this question
1  
Well, it depends. How many languages are you going to have? Or will it be just English and the country's language? – NullUserException Sep 1 '11 at 12:30
    
There could be any number of languages. Imagine an e-commerce backend, for example. – Alessandro Sep 1 '11 at 12:32
1  
Then go for the 2nd option – NullUserException Sep 1 '11 at 12:37
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I recommend going with the second option, although you appear to have some data-typos.

Country:

Id  Code
===============
1   IT

Localized_Country:

CountryId  LanguageCode  LocalizedName
=========================================
1          IT            Italia
1          EN            Italy

Which you then query like so:

SELECT a.Id, b.LocalizedName
FROM Country as a
JOIN Localized_Country as b
ON b.CountryId = a.Id
AND b.LanguageCode = :InputLanguageCode
WHERE a.Code = :InputInternationalCountryCode

Wrap that (or something similar) up in a view, and you're golden.

Some recommendations:
You may want to push Language (or some other type of Locale concept) into it's own table. The key can either be an auto-increment value, or the international characters, doesn't much matter which.
Make sure to put a unique constraint on (CountryId, LanguageCode), just in case. And never forget your foreign keys.

share|improve this answer
    
Why are you adding "WHERE a.Code = :InputInternationalCountryCode"? – Alessandro Sep 2 '11 at 8:07
    
Because I need something that says exactly which country I'm talking about, independent of the language/localization. For countries, this would be the ISO standard codes (2/3 letters). If I wanted the list of all countries, then I'd leave it off. You didn't give the end application, but for a website, you'd be passing the ISO code for country based parameters. – Clockwork-Muse Sep 6 '11 at 15:33
    
Yes, that's correct. Thank you! – Alessandro Sep 7 '11 at 6:58

I will go with second one, it's more flexible, just remember to create index on CountryId column in the second table.

I've just noticed your query:

SELECT CountryID, Code, Name
FROM Countries INNER JOIN CountriesLoc ON Countries.CountryID = CountriesLocs.CountryID
WHERE LocalizationCode = 'EN'

why are you adding

where LocalizationCode = 'EN'

Do you assume that for country Italy can be more than one language?

EDITED

    SELECT CountryID, Code, Name
FROM Countries INNER JOIN CountriesLoc ON Countries.CountryID = CountriesLocs.CountryID
WHERE Code = 'EN'
share|improve this answer
    
Because if I'm using the frontend in Italian I want to output "Italia", otherwise in English I want to output "Italy". – Alessandro Sep 1 '11 at 12:38
    
ok, i get it. but then i think more efficient will be to filter on Code column - see my edited answer for sql – Adrian Serafin Sep 1 '11 at 12:44
    
But "Code" will never be 'EN' because the international code for Italy is 'IT'. Sorry, my example was not very useful... – Alessandro Sep 1 '11 at 12:46
    
Then I think you should add EN into first table and when deciding what language to use do something like that: code = is_language_selected ? "lan_selected_by_user" : 'EN'. I think it will be much more efficient to filter by Code than LocalizationCode. – Adrian Serafin Sep 1 '11 at 13:45

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