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I have this code that basically reads from file and creates new file and write the content from the source to the destination file. It reads the buffer and creates the file, but fwrite
doesn't write the content to the newly created file, I have no idea why.
here is the code. (I have to use only this with _sopen, its part of legacy code)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <io.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <string>
#include <share.h>
#include <sys\stat.h>


int main () {
  std::string szSource = "H:\\cpp\\test1.txt";
  FILE* pfFile;
  int iFileId = _sopen(szSource.c_str(),_O_RDONLY, _SH_DENYNO, _S_IREAD);
  if (iFileId >= 0) 
     pfFile = fdopen(iFileId, "r");
   //read file content to buffer 
   char * buffer;
   size_t result;
   long lSize;
   // obtain file size:
   fseek (pfFile , 0 , SEEK_END);
   lSize = ftell (pfFile);
   fseek(pfFile, 0, SEEK_SET);
 //   buffer = (char*) malloc (sizeof(char)*lSize);
   buffer = (char*) malloc (sizeof(char)*lSize);

   if (buffer == NULL)
   {

       return false;
   }

   // copy the file into the buffer:
   result = fread (buffer,lSize,1,pfFile);   
   std::string szdes = "H:\\cpp\\test_des.txt";
   FILE* pDesfFile;
   int iFileId2 = _sopen(szdes.c_str(),_O_CREAT,_SH_DENYNO,_S_IREAD | _S_IWRITE);
  if (iFileId2 >= 0) 
     pDesfFile = fdopen(iFileId2, "w+");

   size_t f = fwrite (buffer , 1, sizeof(buffer),pDesfFile );
   printf("Error code: %d\n",ferror(pDesfFile));

   fclose (pDesfFile);

  return 0;
}

You can make main file and try it see if its working for you .
Thanks

share|improve this question
2  
Yes, sizeof(buffer) is 4, it is a pointer. You need to use lSize in the fwrite() call. – Hans Passant Sep 1 '11 at 13:12
    
Is there a good reason to do this in quite such a convoluted way? Is this part of some assignment or something? Is there a particular reason to do it this way? – Gian Sep 1 '11 at 13:13
2  
Are you sure _sopen() returns valid file descriptors? I don't see you're checking tht properly (for example, you fseek() the file even if _sopen did not succeed). And why you're mixing C and C++ with no sense (or at least I don't see the sense)? If you're going to use C++, use ofstream to write to files. – m0skit0 Sep 1 '11 at 13:14
    
yes it does in the end i can read the content to the buffer – user63898 Sep 1 '11 at 13:48
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Change your code to the following and then report your results:

int main () {
  std::string szSource = "H:\\cpp\\test1.txt";
  int iFileId = _sopen(szSource.c_str(),_O_RDONLY, _SH_DENYNO, _S_IREAD);
  if (iFileId >= 0) 
  {
    FILE* pfFile;
    if ((pfFile = fdopen(iFileId, "r")) != (FILE *)NULL)
    {
      //read file content to buffer 
      char * buffer;
      size_t result;
      long lSize;
      // obtain file size:
      fseek (pfFile , 0 , SEEK_END);
      lSize = ftell (pfFile);
      fseek(pfFile, 0, SEEK_SET);
      if ((buffer = (char*) malloc (lSize)) == NULL)
        return false;

      // copy the file into the buffer:
      result = fread (buffer,(size_t)lSize,1,pfFile);   
      fclose(pfFile);

      std::string szdes = "H:\\cpp\\test_des.txt";
      FILE* pDesfFile;
      int iFileId2 = _sopen(szdes.c_str(),_O_CREAT,_SH_DENYNO,_S_IREAD | _S_IWRITE);
      if (iFileId2 >= 0) 
      {
        if ((pDesfFile = fdopen(iFileId2, "w+")) != (FILE *)NULL)
        {
          size_t f = fwrite (buffer, (size_t)lSize, 1, pDesfFile);
          printf ("elements written <%d>\n", f);

          if (f == 0)
            printf("Error code: %d\n",ferror(pDesfFile));

          fclose (pDesfFile);
        }
      }
    }
  }

  return 0;
}

[edit]

for other posters, to show the usage/results of fwrite - what is the output of the following?

#include <stdio.h>

int main (int argc, char **argv) {
   FILE *fp = fopen ("f.kdt", "w+");

   printf ("wrote %d\n", fwrite ("asdf", 4, 1, fp));

   fclose (fp);
}

[/edit]

share|improve this answer
    
h:\cpp\fwrite_read\fwrite_read\fwrite_read.cpp(88) : error C3861: '_sclose': identifier not found h:\cpp\fwrite_read\fwrite_read\fwrite_read.cpp(91) : error C3861: '_sclose': identifier not found – user63898 Sep 1 '11 at 14:49
    
sorry, wasn't aware you weren't literate in your own environment - it should be _close, not _sclose (BTW, I'm not literate, but my google foo is powerful) – KevinDTimm Sep 1 '11 at 14:51
    
im getting : on _sclose Debug Assertion Failed Expression (_osfile(fh) & FOPEN) p.s believe me i searched google all day //// – user63898 Sep 1 '11 at 14:57
    
how can you get an error on _sclose when it should have been replaced with _close? – KevinDTimm Sep 1 '11 at 14:59
    
its my typo here wrong its _close – user63898 Sep 1 '11 at 15:07

sizeof(buffer) is the size of the pointer, i.e. 4 and not the number of items in the buffer

If buffer is an array then sizeof(buffer) would potentially work as it returns the number of bytes in the array.

share|improve this answer
    
when i change the command to size_t f = fwrite (buffer , 1, lSize ,pDesfFile ); it returns me 22 but the file is still empty – user63898 Sep 1 '11 at 13:26
    
@user63898 Is the file 0 bytes in size? – PJL Sep 1 '11 at 13:31
    
@user63898 Have you confirmed that buffer has been created successfully? – PJL Sep 1 '11 at 13:33
    
yeah with if (buffer == NULL), also i see in the debugger the string content when it hits :result = fread (buffer,lSize,1,pfFile); also i tried : buffer = (char*) malloc (sizeof(char)*lSize); – user63898 Sep 1 '11 at 13:41
    
@user63898, sorry I meant filled-up rather than initialized. – PJL Sep 1 '11 at 14:09

The third parameter to fwrite is sizeof(buffer) which is 4 bytes (a pointer). You need to pass in the number of bytes to write instead (lSize).

Update: It also looks like you're missing the flag indicating the file should be Read/Write: _O_RDWR

This is working for me...

   std::string szdes = "C:\\temp\\test_des.txt"; 
   FILE* pDesfFile; 
   int iFileId2;
   err = _sopen_s(&iFileId2, szdes.c_str(), _O_CREAT|_O_BINARY|_O_RDWR, _SH_DENYNO, _S_IREAD | _S_IWRITE); 
   if (iFileId2 >= 0)  
      pDesfFile = _fdopen(iFileId2, "w+"); 

   size_t f = fwrite (buffer , 1, lSize, pDesfFile ); 
   fclose (pDesfFile); 
share|improve this answer
    
see the answer to PJL – user63898 Sep 1 '11 at 13:26
    
It also looks like you're missing the flag indicating the file should be Read/Write: _O_RDWR I also switched to using the safer _sopen_s() form. – jschroedl Sep 2 '11 at 23:30

Since I can't find info about _sopen, I can only look at man open. It reports:

int open(const char *pathname, int flags);
int open(const char *pathname, int flags, mode_t mode);

Your call _sopen(szdes.c_str(),_O_CREAT,_SH_DENYNO,_S_IREAD | _S_IWRITE); doesn't match either one of those, you seem to have flags and 'something' and modes / what is SH_DENY?

What is the result of man _sopen?

Finally, shouldn't you close the file descriptor from _sopen after you fclose the file pointer?

Your final lines should look like this, btw :

if (iFileId2 >= 0) 
{
  pDesfFile = fdopen(iFileId2, "w+");
  size_t f = fwrite (buffer , 1, sizeof(buffer),pDesfFile ); //<-- the f returns me 4
  fclose (pDesfFile);
}

Since you currently write the file regardless of whether or not the fdopen after the O_CREAT succeeded. You also do the same thing at the top, you process the read (and the write) regardless of the success of the fdopen of the RDONLY file :(

share|improve this answer
    
this is windows function is IO.h, constants from :#include <share.h> #include <sys\stat.h> – user63898 Sep 1 '11 at 13:48
    
hi , still dont work , it return 4 in the f. – user63898 Sep 1 '11 at 14:09
    
it returned 22 before and now it returns 4 (again)? Note that man fwrite says : size_t fwrite(const void *ptr, size_t size, size_t nmemb, FILE *stream);, in which case you're trying to write either 4 or 22 items of size 1 - depending upon what code you're running – KevinDTimm Sep 1 '11 at 14:27
1  
so, your code is still wrong (you're still using sizeof (buffer)) - see my next post please – KevinDTimm Sep 1 '11 at 14:40
1  
why would you do that? see my comment above (man fwrite) - YOU'RE DOING IT WRONG - long and size_t are not the same, the order of your arguments is wrong - please use the code below and discuss from there – KevinDTimm Sep 1 '11 at 14:56

You are using a mixture of C and C++. That is confusing. The sizeof operator does not do what you expect it to do.

share|improve this answer

Looks like @PJL and @jschroedl found the real problem, but also in general:

Documentation for fwrite states:

fwrite returns the number of full items actually written, which may be less than count if an error occurs. Also, if an error occurs, the file-position indicator cannot be determined.

So if the return value is less than the count passed, use ferror to find out what happened.

The ferror routine (implemented both as a function and as a macro) tests for a reading or writing error on the file associated with stream. If an error has occurred, the error indicator for the stream remains set until the stream is closed or rewound, or until clearerr is called against it.

share|improve this answer
    
add printf("Error code: %d\n",ferror(pDesfFile)); it gives me 0 – user63898 Sep 1 '11 at 13:29
    
Yes, because there is no error in this case, as you are not giving the correct size to write (using your original code). If there is an error actually writing the file, this is what you could use to find out why. If it does not give an error code, it is not in the fwrite! – crashmstr Sep 1 '11 at 17:53

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