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If a user inserts rows into a table, i would like SQL Server to perform some additional processing - but not in the context of the user's transaction.

e.g. The user gives read access to a folder:

UPDATE Folders SET ReadAccess = 1
WHERE FolderID = 7

As far as the user is concerned i want that to be the end of the atomic operation. In reality i have to now go find all child files and folders and give them ReadAccess.

EXECUTE SynchronizePermissions

This is a potentially lengthy operation (over 2s). i want this lengthy operation to happen "later". It can happen 0 seconds later, and before the carbon-unit has a chance to think about it the asynchronous update is done.

How can i run this required operation asychronously when it's required (i.e. triggered)?

The ideal would be:

CREATE TRIGGER dbo.Folders FOR INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE AS
   EXECUTEASYNCHRONOUS SynchronizePermissions

or

CREATE TRIGGER dbo.Folders FOR INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE AS
   EXECUTE SynchronizePermissions WITH(ASYNCHRONOUS)

Right now this happens as a trigger:

CREATE TRIGGER dbo.Folders FOR INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE AS
   EXECUTE SynchronizePermissions

and the user is forced to wait the 3 seconds every time they make a change to the Folders table.

i've thought about creating a Scheduled Task on the user, that runs every minute, and check for an PermissionsNeedSynchronizing flag:

CREATE TRIGGER dbo.Folders FOR INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE AS
   UPDATE SystemState SET PermissionsNeedsSynchronizing = 1

The scheduled task binary can check for this flag, run if the flag is on:

DECLARE @FlagValue int
SET @FlagValue = 0;

UPDATE SystemState SET @FlagValue = PermissionsNeedsSynchronizing+1
WHERE PermissionsNeedsSynchronizing = 1

IF @FlagValue = 2
BEGIN
   EXECUTE SynchronizePermissions

   UPDATE SystemState SET PermissionsNeedsSynchronizing = 0
   WHERE PermissionsNeedsSynchronizing = 2
END

The problem with a scheduled task is: - the fastest it can run is every 60 seconds - it's suffers from being a polling solution - it requires an executable

What i'd prefer is a way that SQL Server could trigger the scheduled task:

CREATE TRIGGER dbo.Folders FOR INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE AS
   EXECUTE SynchronizePermissionsAsychronous


CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.SynchronizePermissionsAsychronous AS

   EXECUTE sp_ms_StartWindowsScheduledTask @taskName="SynchronousPermissions"

The problem with this is: - there is no sp_ms_StartWinodowsScheduledTask system stored procedure

So i'm looking for ideas for better solutions.


Update: The previous example is a problem, that has has no good solution, for five years now. A problem from 3 years ago, that has no good solution is a table that i need to update a meta-data column after an insert/update. The metadata takes too long to calculate in online transaction processing, but i am ok with it appearing 3 or 5 seconds later:

CREATE TRIGGER dbo.UpdateFundsTransferValues FOR INSERT, UPDATE AS

UPDATE FundsTransfers
SET TotalOrderValue = (SELECT ....[snip]....),
    TotalDropValue = (SELECT ....,[snip]....)
WHERE FundsTransfers.FundsTransferID IN (
    SELECT i.FundsTransferID
    FROM INSERTED i
)

And the problem that i'm having today is a way to asychronously update some metadata after a row has been transitionally inserted or modified:

CREATE TRIGGER dbo.UpdateCDRValue FOR INSERT, UPDATE AS

UPDATE LCDs
SET CDRValue = (SELECT ....[snip]....)
WHERE LCDs.LCDGUID IN (
    SELECT i.LCDGUID
    FROM INSERTED i
)

Update 2: i've thought about creating a native, or managed, dll and using it as an extended stored procedure. The problem with that is:

  • you can't script a binary
  • i'm now allowed to do it
share|improve this question
1  
In 2000 I think you are out of luck finding a "push" solution as no service broker. –  Martin Smith Sep 1 '11 at 14:40
1  
I was so excited to recommend using Service Broker to implement asynchronous triggers. Then I saw the SQL 2K tag and I cried a little bit to myself :( –  Yuck Sep 1 '11 at 14:40
    
i only really added 2000 so that people wouldn't suggest writing an extended stored procedure, or a .NET managed stored procedure; also because some databases are still running on SQL Server 2000 (until middle of next year) –  Ian Boyd Sep 1 '11 at 14:59
2  
@Ian instead of fooling us by changing your version, why not just state in the question that one of your requirements is to avoid XPs and CLR? –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 1 '11 at 15:02
    
@Yuck Reading about Service Broker; it sounds like a lot of trouble. –  Ian Boyd Sep 1 '11 at 15:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use a queue table, and have a different background process pick things up off the queue and process them. The trigger itself is by definition a part of the user's transaction - this is precisely why they are often discouraged (or at least people are warned to not use expensive techniques inside triggers).

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1  
+1 The important part here is the queue table. Dump data into it as quickly as possible and get out of the trigger. –  Yuck Sep 1 '11 at 14:42
1  
what about...ServerBroker or... Create a job and run it with sp_start_job 'JobName'..I don't believe the trigger would wait for completion of the job.....Edit didn't see the 2000 tag –  SQLMenace Sep 1 '11 at 14:43
    
@SQLMenace - You're right, that works for triggering asynch tasks. Think it might need elevated permissions though. –  Martin Smith Sep 1 '11 at 14:44
    
What technique would you use to get a background process to pick things out of the queue and process them? Windows Task Scheduler has a resolution of 5 minutes. i've tried using a Windows service but that requires installing a Windows service, and when it crashes all processing stops. i've tried a scheduled task that starts a long-lived worker process, and if the new process finds another process already running then exist, but that fails when the new worker process doesn't have permission to see or register global mutexes. Is task sched smart enough to not re-start a running task? –  Ian Boyd Sep 10 '12 at 15:10

Create a SQL Agent job and run it with sp_start_job..it shouldn't wait for completion

However you need the proper permission to run jobs

Members of SQLAgentUserRole and SQLAgentReaderRole can only start jobs that they own. Members of SQLAgentOperatorRole can start all local jobs including those that are owned by other users. Members of sysadmin can start all local and multiserver jobs.

The problem with this approach is that if the job is already running it can't be started until it is finished

Otherwise go with the queue table that Aaron suggested, it is cleaner and better

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1  
The problem with this is that the job is started every time the trigger is invoked. On a busy or cyclic system this can mean failures due to the job already running, or the job running quite often - probably more than necessary if the queued task does not need to be immediate. If you insert into a queue table, your background process is going to control its own destiny, so to speak - it will run on your schedule, not vary with the busy-ness of the server. –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 1 '11 at 14:49
    
That is a valid point –  SQLMenace Sep 1 '11 at 14:50

We came across this problem some time ago, and I figured out a solution that works beautifully. I do have a process running in the background-- but just like you, I didn't want it to have to poll every 60 seconds.

Here are the steps:

(1) Our trigger doesn't run the db update itself. It merely throws a "flag file" into a folder that is monitored by the background process.

(2) The background process monitors that folder using Windows Change Notification (this is the really cool part, because you don't have to poll the folder-- your process sleeps until Windows notifies it that a file has appeared). Whenever the background process is awoken by Windows, it runs the db update. Then it deletes the flag file(s), goes to sleep again and tells Windows to wake it up when another file appears in the folder.

This is working exactly as you described: the triggered update runs shortly after the main database event, and voila, the user doesn't have to wait the extra few seconds. I just love it.

You don't necessarily need to compile your own executable to do this: many scripting languges can use Windows Change Notification. I wrote the background process in Perl and it only took a few minutes to get it working.

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