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How do I introspect A's instance from within b.func() (i.e. A's instance's self):

class A():
    def go(self):
        b=B()
        b.func()

class B():
    def func(self):
        # Introspect to find the calling A instance here
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Note that in Python 2.x, it is best to inherit from object rather than nothing so that you are using new-style classes. –  Mike Graham Sep 1 '11 at 15:18
    
There is no portable way to do this (the only way to do it in CPython is by grabbing the parent frame and inspecting it, but not all Python implementations expose this data) –  Nick Bastin Sep 1 '11 at 15:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

In general it is poor practice for B.func to have access to the instance A, because this breaks encapsulation. With the interfaces you have given, when you go into the body of b.func() you have no business knowing about the calling A instance, or in fact the state of any caller bar the parent B instance. Since B.func is a method of B class, the objects a bound method should have access to are only globals and the attributes of the parent B instance, accessed via the self argument to the function in your case.

If you want to know about a calling object, the valid ways are:

  1. Pass the calling object in as an argument to the function (as already suggested by Benjamin above)
  2. Explicitly add a handle to the caller into b instance sometime before calling b.func(), and then access that handle through the self argument to func.

The correct way depends on your use-case, but almost always 1. would be the way unless you're doing something a bit awkward.


HOWEVER, with all those disclaimers out of the way, it is also worth knowing that python's introspection capabilities are powerful enough to access the caller module in some cases. If you are using CPython, here is a fragile, non-portable, and smelly way to access the calling A instance in your case:

class A():
    def go(self):
        b=B()
        b.func()

class B():
    def func(self):
        import inspect
        print inspect.currentframe().f_back.f_locals['self']

if __name__ == '__main__':
  a = A()
  a.go()

Output:

<__main__.A instance at 0x15bd9e0>

This can be useful for debugging code. But it would not be a sensible design decision in the case that B.func actually needed to use A for any reason.

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1  
This is fragile (there are plenty of cases we could construct with which it does not work) and non-portable (inspect.currentframe is an implementation detail). –  Mike Graham Sep 1 '11 at 15:20
2  
+1 for answering the question as asked ( regardless of whether it is wise to do it this way ). Where will this not work? I suspect the "disclaimer" about currentframe() is alluding to Stackless ( not to Jython or Iron Python )....can anyone confirm this? –  Nick Perkins Sep 1 '11 at 15:32
3  
@Nick, "+1 for answering the question as asked ( regardless of whether it is wise to do it this way )." This is the worst possible philosophy...I hope you never get a job at a gun store! –  Mike Graham Sep 1 '11 at 16:04
2  
@wim Actually, it's up to the community whether this knowledge is helpful to more than just the poster. That's why it's getting downvotes. These are a signal that what you posted is a poor solution for the OP to use. –  Wilduck Sep 1 '11 at 16:18
7  
I find this all astonishing. Do people think that Python's ability to do introspection should be kept secret just because it's usually not the right thing to do? Only one answer gave the right facts, and people downvote it? Facts are facts. Do the downvoters object to revealing this "secret knowlege"? You all have no idea why the OP is looking for this, and therefore you can not judge that it is wrong. There are certainly possible situations where this type of introspection would be valuable. So, imho, ok to warn against it, but should not downvote ans for revealing how it can be done. –  Nick Perkins Sep 2 '11 at 1:26

You pass it to b.func() as an argument.

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That was my workaround, however I wanted to find out how to refrain from that –  Jonathan Sep 1 '11 at 15:15
    
Why? What's wrong with passing it? –  Michal Chruszcz Sep 1 '11 at 15:16
7  
That's not a workaround. That's how you give other functions context. –  Benjamin Peterson Sep 1 '11 at 15:17
2  
What is your specific design? I seriously doubt it, though. "Explicit is better than implicit" –  Benjamin Peterson Sep 1 '11 at 15:21
1  
agreed. technically you can get the caller, but b.func() really has no business knowing who called it –  wim Sep 1 '11 at 15:22

Do this by refactoring your code to work like

class A():
    def go(self):
        b = B(self)
        b.func()

class B():
    def __init__(self, a):
        self.a = a

    def func(self):
        # Use self.a

or

class A():
    def go(self):
        b = B()
        b.func(self)

class B():
    def func(self, a):
        # a
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Actually there are many As that may call B's instance. I wouldn't like to keep them all in B's instance –  Jonathan Sep 1 '11 at 15:18
    
@Johnathan, In the example snippet, Bs were made by an A, and it wasn't clear they were kept and used by many different As. It sounds like you may want to pass the right A precisely when you cal B.func, like in my second example. –  Mike Graham Sep 1 '11 at 15:23

I agree with Benjamin - pass it to b.func() as an argument and don't introspect it!!!!

If your life really depends on it, then I think you can deduce the answer from this answer.

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