Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Child has two parents: Foo and Bar. Foo does not allow copying. Bar does. How can Child use Bar's assignment operator to copy into Bar's subset of Child (while leaving Foo's subset intact)?

To be more concrete: in the code below, how can Child refer to just Bar inside replace_bar()? (How would you modify line (X) to make the code compile?)

class Foo
{
public:
    Foo () {}
private:
    Foo (const Foo & f) {} // forbid copy construction
    Foo & operator= (const Foo & foo) {} // forbid assignment
};

class Bar
{
public:
    Bar () {}
    Bar & operator= (const Bar & bar) {}
};

class Child : public Foo, public Bar
{
public:
    Child () {}
    void replace_bar (const Bar & bar2)
    {
        *this = bar2;           // line (X)
    }
};

int main ()
{
    Child child;
    Bar newbar;
    child.replace_bar (newbar);
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
void replace_bar(const Bar& bar2) {
     Bar::operator=(bar2);
}

In other news, you're missing a return *this; in Bar::operator= and if all you want to do is prevent copy of Foo you shouldn't define the copy constructor and assignment operator, only declare them. That way even if you try to use them from within the class you'll get an error (albeit a link error not a compile error).

class Foo {
    Foo(const Foo&); // no body
    Foo& operator=(const Foo&); // ditto
public: 
    Foo() { }
};
share|improve this answer
    
The answer seems so obvious now that I see it. Thanks. Re: declaring rather than defining: good point. Re: 'return *this;' -- also a good point, though only relevant when Bar's variables are introduced. –  Calaf Sep 1 '11 at 16:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.