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I am implementing Comparable interface on a trivial class that wraps a single int member.

I can implement it this way:

    @Override
    public int compareTo ( final MyType o )
    {
        return
            Integer.valueOf( this.intVal ).compareTo(
                Integer.valueOf( o.intVal )
            );
    }

But this (maybe) creates 2 totally unnecessary Integer objects.

Or I can go tried and true cut-and-paste approach from Integer class:

    @Override
    public int compareTo ( final MyType o )
    {
      int thisVal = this.intValue;
      int anotherVal = o.intValue;
      return (thisVal<anotherVal ? -1 : (thisVal==anotherVal ? 0 : 1));
    }

This is pretty efficient, but duplicates code unnecessary.

Is there a library that would implement this missing Integer ( and Double and Float ) method?

   public static int compare ( int v1, int v2 );
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1  
Could you copy the Integer compareTo() to a new method that takes two arguments instead of using this? –  BenCole Sep 1 '11 at 16:10

4 Answers 4

  • For int, write your own compare method (it requires at most three lines of code).
  • For double, use Double.compare (not to be confused with compareTo).
  • For float, use Float.compare.

The last two take primitive types and thus avoid boxing and unboxing. I can see an argument for Integer providing a similar compare method, but as things stand it doesn't.

share|improve this answer
    
Integer also has a compare –  Steve Kuo Sep 1 '11 at 16:18
    
@Steve Kuo: Link to Javadoc please? –  NPE Sep 1 '11 at 16:18
    
You are correct. I was thinking of compareTo, in which case he could do Integer.valueOf(i1).compareTo(i2). –  Steve Kuo Sep 1 '11 at 16:24
    
@Steve Kuo: No, it doesn't, that's the point. And, by the way, if you've read the question I know how to do Integer.valueOf –  Alexander Pogrebnyak Sep 1 '11 at 16:26
    
+1: For byte, short, int and float you can use Double.compare(). –  Peter Lawrey Sep 1 '11 at 19:14
up vote 3 down vote accepted

In Java 7, static int compare for primitive types have been added to all primitive object wrapper classes, i.e there is now:

java.lang.Integer: static int compare( int x, int y );
java.lang.Byte: static int compare( byte x, byte y );
java.lang.Short: static int compare( short x, short y );
etc...
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Maybe, I'm missing something, but IMHO this is a weird question.

Is there a library that would implement this missing Integer ( and Double and Float ) method?

public static int compare ( int v1, int v2 );

Well, I think this does the job:

public static int compare ( int v1, int v2 )
{
    if (v1 < v2) return -1;
    if (v1 > v2) return  1;
    return 0;
}
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1  
generally, the code is just return v1 - v2; –  barjak Sep 1 '11 at 16:16
2  
@barjak: Nope, please check stackoverflow.com/questions/7273091/… and it comments. –  Martijn Courteaux Sep 1 '11 at 16:20

This solution is simple, but perhaps simplistic:

public static int compare ( int v1, int v2 )
{
    return v1 - v2;
}

Note: @aix is correct! This approach will not work for arbitrary integers. It will work for always-positive integers though, for example auto generated database keys etc

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6  
How about integer overflow? –  NPE Sep 1 '11 at 16:17
1  
@Martijn Courteaux, you are incorrect, compare and compareTo specify negative, 0, positive values. It doesn't dictate -1, 0 1. Any code that checks for -1 is bad and broken code. See download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/… –  Steve Kuo Sep 1 '11 at 16:20
1  
No, the Javadoc says "negative, zero or positive", for both Comparable and Integer. –  barjak Sep 1 '11 at 16:22
    
@Steve Kuo: Oops, indeed! Thanks, I learnt something today :D –  Martijn Courteaux Sep 1 '11 at 16:23

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