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I am trying to trim down FreeBSD to understand/learn how things work. I have a few questions if someone can help me with that:

1) when we say kernel, can I separate code wise from the rest of the FreeBSD code? What I mean is, I want to know what all files/dirs come under kernel.

2) I know a book called Linux from scratch. Is there any related book for FreeBSD?

Any pointers are most welcome.

Thank you.

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closed as off topic by Paul R, JaredPar, Peer Stritzinger, Robert Harvey Oct 12 '11 at 3:19

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

FreeBSD is one cohesive system. Whereas Linux is a kernel plus a bunch of packages, all of FreeBSD core is built together (everything but the ports tree). The FreeBSD Handbook is the best resource to start from for learning FreeBSD. There is also a Developer's handbook that can be found on the FreeBSD website. As for what the kernel is in terms of source files, anything under /usr/src/sys is kernel source code. If you want to know about the workings of the kernel, the book "The Design and Implementation of the FreeBSD Operating System" is the definitive guide to the details of the kernel.

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Thanks for responding. I tried developer's handbook and couldn't find much. I will try to go through The Design and Implementation of the FreeBSD Operating System. I want to understand what you mean by "one cohesive system". But I guess I will come to know once I read the book. Is my assumption correct? –  hirapanna Sep 1 '11 at 16:57
    
I mean that it's one whole system, instead of a collection of different packages that happen to work together. ls, cp, sh, etc, are all developed and built together from one single source tree. –  chmeee Sep 1 '11 at 17:16

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