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This is my code:

$myDiv = $('<div>1</div>');

$myDiv.each(function () {
    console.log(this.html());
});

It produces an error because this should be $(this). But wait. Isn't $myDiv a jQuery object in the first place, so that this must also be a jQuery object. If so, why should I wrap this inside of $( )?

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1  
Sorry, but this is not selector : '<div>1</div>' –  Alleo Sep 1 '11 at 16:41
2  
You should see this thread: stackoverflow.com/q/3001045/49186 –  dexter Sep 1 '11 at 16:43
2  
@Alleo This code creates a new div with 1 in the innerHTML. It doesn't select an existing element. –  Dennis Sep 1 '11 at 16:43
    
@Dennis Didn't know about this overload, thanks. –  Alleo Sep 1 '11 at 16:46

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

A jQuery object is more or less an array of regular DOM elements. each iterates over these. this is just a DOM element whereas $(this) generates a one-element array of DOM elements with access to the jQuery API functions.

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Please note: All JQuery methods are automatically applied to every element in that array. If you don't need to deal with individual elements in a case by case basis as per above, there is no reason to use .each. $('li').hide(); hides all LIs. $('li').myNewMethod would also be applied to all LIs even if you only defined it to hit 'this' (which refers to the JQ object when extending). –  Erik Reppen Jul 18 '12 at 22:47
    
Oops. NM. Totally wrong on part of that. The built-in methods typically loop for you. Nothing auto-loops internally (I was wondering how they pulled that off). –  Erik Reppen Jul 18 '12 at 23:02

In that case this actually refers to the node.

$myDiv = $('<div>1</div>');

$myDiv.each(function () {
    console.log(this.innerHTML);
});
// outputs 1
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Basically anything fetched as $() becomes part of an array which jQuery adds it's helper methods to, the .each() method actually iterates over each element in the array. That is, it's just the element and not the jQuery array that has all the nice helper methods.

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As I understand it, this is a DOM object. Try this code to see:

$myDiv = $('<div>1</div>'); $myDiv.each(function () { alert(this.nodeName); });

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According to the jquery documentation this is the expected behavior for the $(selector).each() They even give you an example for the case where "you want to have the jQuery object instead of the regular DOM element": http://api.jquery.com/each/#example-1

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When you create an HTML object in jQuery like you did it returns the DOM element. If you really wanted to set the HTML of your new dom element you'd have to call the innerHTML property like so:

$myDiv.each(function () {
    console.log(this.innerHTML);
});

For reference here's the jQUery API on creating DOM elements: http://api.jquery.com/jQuery/#jQuery2

Also, I'm not sure why you'd call the each function on a single element that has just been created?

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