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I have a function that is declared like:

template<typename T>
void MyFunction();

And a class:

template<typename T>
class MyClass
{
public:

    typedef void (*Function_T)();
    Function_T m_Func;
    void DoSomething()
    {
        m_Func = &MyFunction<T>;
    }
}

When I use the class, I undefined symbols error on MyFunction<T>.
If I change DoSomething to

void DoSomething()
{
    m_Func = &MyFunction<T>;
    return;
    MyFunction<T>();
}

Everything works, but that looks like a workaround and will probably not work with optimization.
I cannot add

template void MyFunction<T>;

to the class because it says it cannot be in class. Is there any other way I can force instantiation of the function?

Edit:
I was able to write a test that fails, but in g++ it has a different message and actually a compiler error: http://ideone.com/RbMnh

share|improve this question
    
Does MyFunction have a body? – AJG85 Sep 1 '11 at 17:28
    
@AJG85: it does in the same place, but its not relavent for the question. – Dani Sep 1 '11 at 17:30
    
What compiler and version? Have you realized that Function_T is not a function pointer but rather a void*? Is the definition of MyFunction available at the place of instantiation? – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 1 '11 at 17:30
1  
@Dani: Whether the definition is or not present at the place of instantiation of the MyClass template is very relevant. If you provide only the declaration, the compiler will trust that you will instantiate the function at some later point (it cannot instantiate it there), and that in turn means that it will create the dependency but not the symbol – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 1 '11 at 17:32
2  
@Sjoerd: The friend declaration will not force the instantiation. Taking the address of the function should, but does not seem to do it, but this could very well be a compiler bug... – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 1 '11 at 17:38

Your code will work with optimization as well. Although, I don't know why simply m_Func = &MyFunction<T> doesn't work. GCC 4.3.4 compiles it fine. Which compiler you're using?

And you can also do this:

void DoSomething()
{
    if ( false) MyFunction<T>();
    m_Func = &MyFunction<T>;
    return;
}

By the way, the function pointer type is incorrectly defined. It should be this:

typedef void (*Function_T)();
                     //   ^^ put this!
share|improve this answer
    
That would probably be subject to the same optimization problems that he was worried about, wouldn't it? – John Humphreys - w00te Sep 1 '11 at 17:25
    
The function pointer is copy error. I'm using clang compiler. – Dani Sep 1 '11 at 17:31
    
I have tried with clang++ 2.8 release 28 and it compiles and links perfectly, what exact version of the compiler are you using? Can you create a minimal full program that exhibits the behavior? – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 1 '11 at 17:36

Your code compiles fine for me using GCC, so I'm not sure if this solution solves your particular problem, but you can explicitly instantiate template functions like so:

// Template function defined:
template <typename T>
void MyFunction() {
    // body
}

// Template function instantiated:
template void MyFunction<int>();
share|improve this answer
    
I reproduced it a bit differently, look at the edit. – Dani Sep 1 '11 at 18:06

The issue can be either a compiler bug, or an error in the parts of the code that you are not showing. Try to build a minimal example that reproduces the problem, this is the minimal example that I have been able to produce, and compiles fine with both clang++ 2.8 and g++ 4.4/4.5:

drodriguez@drodriguez-desktop:/tmp$ cat test.cpp 
#include <iostream>

template <typename T>
void function() {
}

template <typename T>
struct type {
    typedef void (*Func)();
    Func _f;
    void f() {
        _f = &function<T>;
    }
};

int main() {
    type<int> t;
    t.f();
    std::cout << t._f << std::endl;
}
drodriguez@drodriguez-desktop:/tmp$ /usr/bin/clang++ --version
clang version 2.8 (branches/release_28)
Target: x86_64-pc-linux-gnu
Thread model: posix
drodriguez@drodriguez-desktop:/tmp$ /usr/bin/clang++ -o test test.cpp && ./test
1
drodriguez@drodriguez-desktop:/tmp$ g++ --version
g++ (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.5.2-8ubuntu4) 4.5.2
Copyright (C) 2010 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software; see the source for copying conditions.  There is NO
warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

drodriguez@drodriguez-desktop:/tmp$ g++-4.4 -o test test.cpp && ./test
1
share|improve this answer
    
I reproduced it a bit differently, look at the edit. – Dani Sep 1 '11 at 18:05
    
@Dani: That is a completely different error, and it is due to the fact that the types don't match &C<T> has type void (*)(int) and you are trying to cast it into void (*)(), the error can be misleading but if you fix the cast (which is the contextual information that is missing) then the error will go away (well, it will be transformed into another error as the argument does not match the type of the receiving end... ideone.com/Fh0Nx – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 1 '11 at 18:25
    
I need that cast. clang does linker error on that case – Dani Sep 1 '11 at 18:48
    
@Dani that must be a bug in the compiler. I have just verified with clang++ 3.0 in MacOSX and it does trigger a linker error, but it should not have compiled... at any rate there you have the solution: correct the cast. That, and try not to fix the problem while rewriting your problem as a question :) – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 1 '11 at 21:02

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