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I have the following code:

MatchCollection matches = myRegEx.Matches(content);

bool result = (from Match m in matches
               where m.Groups["name"].Value.Length > 128
               select m).Any();

Is there a way to do this using the Linq extension method syntax? Something like this..

bool result = matches.Any(x => ... );
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6 Answers 6

up vote 44 down vote accepted
matches.Cast<Match>().Any(x => x.Groups["name"].Value.Length > 128)

You just need to convert it from an IEnumerable to an IEnumerable<Match> (IEnumerable) to get access to the linq extension provided on IEnumerable.

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Who is down voting every answer on here? This answer gets my upvote, cognrats. –  Kevin Kalitowski Sep 1 '11 at 18:03
    
+1 I'm trying to figure out why this was downvoted. I'm not seeing it. –  Jason Sep 1 '11 at 18:03
    
I'm really confused as to how this got down voted as it is correct –  msarchet Sep 1 '11 at 18:04
    
A lot of answers got downvoted. I've given a similar answer, but one which I hope is slightly fuller. –  Jon Skeet Sep 1 '11 at 18:05
    
This works, just make sure you are using System.Linq else it will give a syntax error –  Ash Berlin Sep 9 '11 at 10:30

When you specify an explicit range variable type, the compiler inserts a call to Cast<T>. So this:

bool result = (from Match m in matches
               where m.Groups["name"].Value.Length > 128
               select m).Any();

is exactly equivalent to:

bool result = matches.Cast<Match>()
                     .Where(m => m.Groups["name"].Value.Length > 128)
                     .Any();

which can also be written as:

bool result = matches.Cast<Match>()
                     .Any(m => m.Groups["name"].Value.Length > 128);

In this case the Cast call is required because MatchCollection only implements ICollection and IEnumerable, not IEnumerable<T>. Almost all the LINQ to Objects extension methods are targeted at IEnumerable<T>, with the notable exceptions of Cast and OfType, both of which are used to convert a "weakly" typed collection (such as MatchCollection) into a generic IEnumerable<T> - which then allows for further LINQ operations.

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On MSDN: Enumerable.Cast<TResult> Method –  DavidRR May 1 at 18:45

Try this:

var matches = myRegEx.Matches(content).Cast<Match>();

For reference, please see Enumerable.Cast:

Converts the elements of an IEnumerable to the specified type.

Basically it's one way of turning an IEnumerable into an IEnumerable<T>.

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+1 I'm trying to figure out why this was downvoted. I'm not seeing it. –  Jason Sep 1 '11 at 18:03
    
@Jason: Most likely someone was trying to boost their answer. –  Andrew Hare Sep 1 '11 at 18:04

You can try something like this:

List<Match> matchList = matches.Cast<Match>().Where(m => m.Groups["name"].Value.Length > 128).ToList();
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I think it would be something like this:

bool result = matches.Cast<Match>().Any(m => m.Groups["name"].Value.Length > 128);
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No. The whole point is that MatchCollection only implements IEnumerable. It is not strongly-typed. –  Jason Sep 1 '11 at 18:01
    
@Jason right, good point, now updated –  pstrjds Sep 1 '11 at 18:06

EDIT:

 public static IEnumerable<T> AsEnumerable<T>(this IEnumerable enumerable)
 {
      foreach(object item in enumerable)
          yield return (T)item;
 }

Then you should be able to call this extension method to turn it into an IEnumerable:

 matches.AsEnumerable<Match>().Any(x => x.Groups["name"].Value.Length > 128);
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This is better than mine, I didn't remember that Any took a predicate. –  pstrjds Sep 1 '11 at 18:00
    
No. The whole point is that MatchCollection only implements IEnumerable. It is not strongly-typed. –  Jason Sep 1 '11 at 18:00
    
@Jason except that it is Castable to an IEnumberable<T> via IEnumberable.Cast<T> –  msarchet Sep 1 '11 at 18:03
    
@msarchet: Yes, I know, which is why I upvoted your answer. This answer, before the edit, wouldn't have even compiled. –  Jason Sep 1 '11 at 18:04
    
Updated with potential fix. –  Tejs Sep 1 '11 at 18:05

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