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For some reason, Python seems to be having issues with BOM when reading unicode strings from a UTF-8 file. Consider the following:

with open('test.py') as f:
   for line in f:
      print unicode(line, 'utf-8')

Seems straightforward, doesn't it?

That's what I thought until I ran it from command line and got:

UnicodeEncodeError: 'charmap' codec can't encode character u'\ufeff' in position 0: character maps to <undefined>

A brief visitation to Google revealed that BOM has to be cleared manually:

import codecs
with open('test.py') as f:
   for line in f:
      print unicode(line.replace(codecs.BOM_UTF8, ''), 'utf-8')

This one runs fine. However I'm struggling to see any merit in this.

Is there a rationale behind above-described behavior? In contrast, UTF-16 works seamlessly.

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3  
It cannot encode it because U+FEFF is an invalid noncharacter. It’s because UTF-8 files aren’t supposed to contain a BOM in them! They are neither required nor recommended. Endianness makes no sense with 8-bit code units. They screw things up, too, because you can no longer just do cat a b c > abc if those files have extraneous (read: any) BOMs in them. UTF-8 streams should not contain a BOM. If you need to specify the contents of the file, you are supposed to use a higher-level prototocl. This is just a Windows bug. –  tchrist Sep 1 '11 at 18:16
    
@tchrist - You know, this explanation in combination with Josh Lee's suggestion would make into a perfect answer. –  Saul Sep 1 '11 at 18:21
    
Ok, added. Hope that works. –  tchrist Sep 1 '11 at 18:28
    
Did your error message happen to mention the filename cp437.py? –  dan04 Sep 1 '11 at 20:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 19 down vote accepted

The 'utf-8-sig' encoding will consume the BOM signature on your behalf.

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Yeah, that's the fix but I was more interested in the why. –  Saul Sep 1 '11 at 18:31
3  
UTF8 has no byte order mark by definition. –  Gringo Suave Sep 1 '11 at 18:55
3  
@Gringo Suave: The funny thing is that the Unicode Standard does allow a BOM in UTF-8. See unicode.org/versions/Unicode5.0.0/ch02.pdf page 36, table 2-4. –  Saul Sep 2 '11 at 15:17
    
Ok, ya got me.. –  Gringo Suave Sep 6 '11 at 0:10

You wrote:

 UnicodeEncodeError: 'charmap' codec can't encode character u'\ufeff' in position 0: character maps to <undefined>

When you specify the "utf-8" encoding in Python, it takes you at your word. UTF-8 files aren’t supposed to contain a BOM in them. They are neither required nor recommended. Endianness makes no sense with 8-bit code units.

BOMs screw things up, too, because you can no longer just do:

$ cat a b c > abc 

if those UTF-8 files have extraneous (read: any) BOMs in them. See now why BOMs are so stupid/bad/harmful in UTF-8? They actually break things.

A BOM is metadata, not data, and the UTF-8 encoding spec makes no allowance for them the way the UTF-16 and UTF-32 specs do. So Python took you at your word and followed the spec. Hard to blame it for that.

If you are trying to use the BOM as a filetype magic number to specify the contents of the file, you really should not be doing that. You are really supposed to use a higher-level prototocl for these metadata purposes, just as you would with a MIME type.

This is just another lame Windows bug, the workaround for which is to use the alternate encoding "utf-8-sig" to pass off to Python.

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1  
You can encode U+FEFF into UTF-8 if you like. You can’t encode it into latin-1, which is what 'charmap' uses for me. –  Josh Lee Sep 1 '11 at 19:01
1  
@Josh: You’re right. I keep getting dylexic malfunction and reading FEFF as FFFE. It’s FFFE that’s illegal for open interchange. FEFF is just ZERO WIDTH NO-BREAK SPACE. –  tchrist Sep 1 '11 at 19:11
2  
It is very frustrating to deal with these, and I'd love to call this a Windows bug, but the standard does indeed allow BOMs in UTF-8 files. See unicode.org/versions/Unicode5.0.0/ch02.pdf page 36, table 2-4 and the text "[a BOM] may be encountered in contexts where UTF-8 data is converted from other encoding forms that use a BOM or where the BOM is used as a UTF-8 signature." and en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byte_order_mark and Re: pre-HTML5 and the BOM from Asmus Freytag on 2012-07-13 (Unicode Mail List Archive) –  nealmcb Oct 7 '12 at 16:51

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