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With this I check if there is already a member registered with the same login. My concern is if the database grows bigger to thousands of members, should I edit this somehow ?

    $qry = "SELECT * FROM registered WHERE login='$login'";
    $result = mysql_query($qry);
    if($result) {
        if(mysql_num_rows($result) > 0) {
            $errmsg_arr[] = 'Login ID already in use';
            $errflag = true;
        }
        @mysql_free_result($result);
    }
    else {
        die("Query failed");
    }
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closed as too localized by Tim Post Mar 4 '12 at 15:17

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Note that "thousands" of members is not a lot for a database. –  Vache Sep 1 '11 at 18:11

4 Answers 4

Just limit the number of columns you're pulling. Rather than SELECT *, just SELECT login or something similar. The query itself won't be slow, as long as login is indexed.

$qry = "SELECT login FROM registered WHERE login='$login'";

Thousands of rows should be no problem at all for the RDBMS. They are designed to handle millions, but you can save a tiny bit of memory by not selecting all columns.

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Just out of curiosity, but would LIMIT 1 make a difference? –  Kevin Sep 1 '11 at 18:11
    
Will this be faster than count(*) ? –  servitora Sep 1 '11 at 18:13
    
@Kevin I don't think limit 1 would make a difference because that affects what rows are fetched. No rows are actually fetched here, we just check the rowcount. –  Michael Berkowski Sep 1 '11 at 18:16
    
@servitora it's probably a bit faster than COUNT(), but unless you have tens of thousands or more, the difference is likely to be negligible. –  Michael Berkowski Sep 1 '11 at 18:17
2  
Assuming login is a unique'd field, then there could only ever be one row to retrieve, so adding a limit clause would be pointless. –  Marc B Sep 1 '11 at 18:36

Few things.

  • You should put an index on the row that you are trying to use in your where condition.
  • Have you already done escapting? If not your query is vulnerable to injection.
  • Even without indexing, 1000 rows is nothing.
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$qry = "SELECT COUNT(*) as cnt FROM registered WHERE login='$login'";
$result = mysql_fetch_assoc(mysql_query($qry));
if($result['cnt']) {
    $errmsg_arr[] = 'Login ID already in use';
    $errflag = true;
}
else {
    die("Query failed");
}
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Why this is faster ? –  servitora Sep 1 '11 at 18:10
    
@servitora: because it's select only count instead of data –  genesis Sep 1 '11 at 18:27

I feel like this won't be any "faster" but you're only returning a single character back to your query if the row exists versus any other field's length.

SELECT 1 FROM registered WHERE login='$login' LIMIT 1
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