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How does SQL Server know to retrieve these values this way?

Key         someMoney
----------- ---------------------
1           5.00
2           5.002
3           5.0001

Basically, I'm wondering how to know how many decimal places there are without much of a performance hit.

I want to get

Key         someMoney             places
----------- --------------------- ----------
1           5.00                  2
2           5.002                 3
3           5.0001                4
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2  
Jsut as an fyi, the money datatype is not a very accurate datatype. if you plan on doing any type of data calculations you're better off using decimal. –  DForck42 Sep 1 '11 at 18:15
    
@DForck42 - thanks, but i'm working an existing system –  Daniel A. White Sep 1 '11 at 18:16

4 Answers 4

The client is formatting that. SQL Server SSMS or whatever. SQL Server is returning a full money value in the data stream and it takes a full 8 bytes. (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc448435.aspx). If you have SQL Server convert to varchar, it defaults to 2 decimal places

Notice that the Stack Overflow data browser doesn't even show the same results you have:

http://data.stackexchange.com/stackoverflow/q/111288/

;
with money_cte ([Key], [someMoney])
as
(
    select 1, cast(5.00 as money)
    union
    select 2, cast(5.002 as money)
    union
    select 3, cast(5.0001 as money)
)

select *
    , CONVERT(varchar, someMoney) AS varchar_version
    , CONVERT(varchar, someMoney, 2) AS varchar_version2
FROM money_cte​
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This produces the correct results, but I'm not sure if it performs well enough for you and I haven't tried it with data other than the examples you listed:

;
with money_cte ([Key], [someMoney])
as
(
    select 1, cast(5.00 as money)
    union
    select 2, cast(5.002 as money)
    union
    select 3, cast(5.0001 as money)
)

select [Key], [someMoney], abs(floor(log10([someMoney] - round([someMoney], 0, 1)))) as places
from money_cte 
where [someMoney] - round([someMoney], 0, 1) <> 0

union

select [Key], [someMoney], 2 as places
from money_cte 
where [someMoney] - round([someMoney], 0, 1) = 0
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So this is a huge ugly hack, but it will give you the value you're looking for...

DECLARE @TestValue MONEY
SET @TestValue = 1.001

DECLARE @TestString VARCHAR(50)
SET @TestString = REPLACE(RTRIM(REPLACE(CONVERT(VARCHAR, CONVERT(DECIMAL(10,4), @TestValue)), '0', ' ')), ' ', '0')

SELECT LEN(@TestString) - CHARINDEX('.', @TestString) AS Places
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Money has 4 decimal places....it's a fixed-point data type.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but I need to know how many are actually being used. –  Daniel A. White Sep 1 '11 at 18:12
    
Four are being used. If you insert the value 1, mssql stores 1.0000 –  Andrew Barber Sep 1 '11 at 18:15
2  
How does sql server then return it with only 2 decimal places? –  Daniel A. White Sep 1 '11 at 18:20
    
So I'm researching this, and came across the concept of VARDECIMAL storage format. (It's a table property.) I initially thought ah-ha! But when I looked at my database, I see it's turned-off and I still get the same display you do. So I don't think this is the answer, but might be worth reading: mssqltips.com/sqlservertip/1614/… –  宮本 武蔵 Sep 1 '11 at 18:41

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